To better see all uses of the word
torment
in
Northanger Abbey
please enable javascript.

torment
Used In
Northanger Abbey
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • "I hope this pleases you" (turning her back on him); "I hope your eyes are not tormented now."
  • If we have not hearts, we have eyes; and they give us torment enough.
  • But I am sure she cannot mean to torment, for she is very much attached to my brother.
  • Whether the torments of absence were softened by a clandestine correspondence, let us not inquire.
  • That room, in which her disturbed imagination had tormented her on her first arrival, was again the scene of agitated spirits and unquiet slumbers.
  • But historians are not accountable for the difficulty of learning to read; and even you yourself, who do not altogether seem particularly friendly to very severe, very intense application, may perhaps be brought to acknowledge that it is very well worth-while to be tormented for two or three years of one’s life, for the sake of being able to read all the rest of it.
  • "You think me foolish to call instruction a torment, but if you had been as much used as myself to hear poor little children first learning their letters and then learning to spell, if you had ever seen how stupid they can be for a whole morning together, and how tired my poor mother is at the end of it, as I am in the habit of seeing almost every day of my life at home, you would allow that ’to torment’ and ’to instruct’ might sometimes be used as synonymous words."
  • "You think me foolish to call instruction a torment, but if you had been as much used as myself to hear poor little children first learning their letters and then learning to spell, if you had ever seen how stupid they can be for a whole morning together, and how tired my poor mother is at the end of it, as I am in the habit of seeing almost every day of my life at home, you would allow that ’to torment’ and ’to instruct’ might sometimes be used as synonymous words."
  • I use the verb ’to torment,’ as I observed to be your own method, instead of ’to instruct,’ supposing them to be now admitted as synonymous."
  • No man is offended by another man’s admiration of the woman he loves; it is the woman only who can make it a torment."
  • If people like to read their books, it is all very well, but to be at so much trouble in filling great volumes, which, as I used to think, nobody would willingly ever look into, to be labouring only for the torment of little boys and girls, always struck me as a hard fate; and though I know it is all very right and necessary, I have often wondered at the person’s courage that could sit down on purpose to do it."
  • "That little boys and girls should be tormented," said Henry, "is what no one at all acquainted with human nature in a civilized state can deny; but in behalf of our most distinguished historians, I must observe that they might well be offended at being supposed to have no higher aim, and that by their method and style, they are perfectly well qualified to torment readers of the most advanced reason and mature time of life.
  • "That little boys and girls should be tormented," said Henry, "is what no one at all acquainted with human nature in a civilized state can deny; but in behalf of our most distinguished historians, I must observe that they might well be offended at being supposed to have no higher aim, and that by their method and style, they are perfectly well qualified to torment readers of the most advanced reason and mature time of life.

  • There are no more uses of "torment" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • She enjoys tormenting others.
  • She concealed her torment.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading