To see all instances of the word
acquit
used in
Northanger Abbey
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acquit
Used in
Northanger Abbey
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  • Now, my sweet Catherine, all our distresses are over; you are honourably acquitted, and we shall have a most delightful party.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • You do acquit me, then, of anything wrong?—You are convinced that I never meant to deceive your brother, never suspected him of liking me till this moment?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • You will soon hear enough from another quarter to know where lies the blame; and I hope will acquit your brother of everything but the folly of too easily thinking his affection returned.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • …What will your father and mother say! After courting you from the protection of real friends to this—almost double distance from your home, to have you driven out of the house, without the considerations even of decent civility! Dear, dear Catherine, in being the bearer of such a message, I seem guilty myself of all its insult; yet, I trust you will acquit me, for you must have been long enough in this house to see that I am but a nominal mistress of it, that my real power is nothing.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: she was acquitted
as in: she acquitted herself well
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