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despondent
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Northanger Abbey
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despondent
Used In
Northanger Abbey
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  • At about eleven o’clock, however, a few specks of small rain upon the windows caught Catherine’s watchful eye, and "Oh! dear, I do believe it will be wet," broke from her in a most desponding tone.
  • It was ages since she had had a moment’s conversation with her dearest Catherine; and, though she had such thousands of things to say to her, it appeared as if they were never to be together again; so, with smiles of most exquisite misery, and the laughing eye of utter despondency, she bade her friend adieu and went on.
  • Catherine was with her friend again the next day, endeavouring to support her spirits and while away the many tedious hours before the delivery of the letters; a needful exertion, for as the time of reasonable expectation drew near, Isabella became more and more desponding, and before the letter arrived, had worked herself into a state of real distress.

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  • When her mother died, she was so despondent it was hard for her to get out of bed.
  • She was despondent about her failure.

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