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countenance
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Northanger Abbey
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countenance
Used In
Northanger Abbey
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as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
  • Eleanor’s countenance was dejected,

  • There are no more uses of "countenance" identified with this meaning, but check unspecified meaning below.

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  • She has a pleasant countenance.
  • Her countenance grew stern.

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unspecified meaning
  • They really put me quite out of countenance.
  • He seemed to be about four or five and twenty, was rather tall, had a pleasing countenance, a very intelligent and lively eye, and, if not quite handsome, was very near it.

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  • I tell him he ought to be ashamed of himself, but you and John must keep us in countenance.
  • Miss Tilney had a good figure, a pretty face, and a very agreeable countenance; and her air, though it had not all the decided pretension, the resolute stylishness of Miss Thorpe’s, had more real elegance.
  • Isabella’s countenance was once more all smiles and good humour, and James too looked happy again.
  • Catherine’s countenance fell, and in a voice of most sincere concern she echoed Miss Tilney’s concluding words, "By the end of another week!"
  • Catherine heard all this, and quite out of countenance, could listen no longer.
  • She looked at him with great admiration, and even supposed it possible that some people might think him handsomer than his brother, though, in her eyes, his air was more assuming, and his countenance less prepossessing.
  • He seemed to be looking in her countenance for that explanation which her lips did not afford.
  • Catherine had never heard Mrs. Tilney mentioned in the family before, and the interest excited by this tender remembrance showed itself directly in her altered countenance, and in the attentive pause with which she waited for something more.

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  • Already had he discerned a liking towards Miss Morland in the countenance of his son; and thankful for Mr. Thorpe’s communication, he almost instantly determined to spare no pains in weakening his boasted interest and ruining his dearest hopes.
  • Her assurance, however, standing sole as it did, was not thrown away; it brought a more cordial, more natural smile into his countenance, and he replied in a tone which retained only a little affected reserve: "We were much obliged to you at any rate for wishing us a pleasant walk after our passing you in Argyle Street: you were so kind as to look back on purpose."
  • Catherine had not read three lines before her sudden change of countenance, and short exclamations of sorrowing wonder, declared her to be receiving unpleasant news; and Henry, earnestly watching her through the whole letter, saw plainly that it ended no better than it began.
  • As they were surveying the last, the general, after slightly naming a few of the distinguished characters by whom they had at times been honoured, turned with a smiling countenance to Catherine, and ventured to hope that henceforward some of their earliest tenants might be "our friends from Fullerton."
  • Of the former, she spoke aloud her admiration; and the general, with a very gracious countenance, acknowledged that it was by no means an ill-sized room, and further confessed that, though as careless on such subjects as most people, he did look upon a tolerably large eating-room as one of the necessaries of life; he supposed, however, "that she must have been used to much better-sized apartments at Mr. Allen’s?"
  • And Eleanor, with a command of countenance which did honour to her concern for his character, taking an early occasion of saying to her, "My father only wanted me to answer a note," she began to hope that she had either been unseen by the general, or that from some consideration of policy she should be allowed to suppose herself so.
  • It represented a very lovely woman, with a mild and pensive countenance, justifying, so far, the expectations of its new observer; but they were not in every respect answered, for Catherine had depended upon meeting with features, hair, complexion, that should be the very counterpart, the very image, if not of Henry’s, of Eleanor’s—the only portraits of which she had been in the habit of thinking, bearing always an equal resemblance of mother and child.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a pleasant countenance Define
facial expression; or face; or composure
as in: giving countenance Define
to tolerate, approve, or show favor or support
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