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Nicholas Nickleby
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Nicholas Nickleby
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unspecified meaning
  • ’A nasty, ungrateful, pig-headed, brutish, obstinate, sneaking dog,’ exclaimed Mrs Squeers, taking Smike’s head under her arm, and administering a cuff at every epithet; ’what does he mean by that?’
  • Mrs Squeers, when excited, was accustomed to use strong language, and, moreover, to make use of a plurality of epithets, some of which were of a figurative kind, as the word peacock, and furthermore the allusion to Nicholas’s nose, which was not intended to be taken in its literal sense, but rather to bear a latitude of construction according to the fancy of the hearers.

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  • Here have I been, a matter of how many weeks—hard upon six—a follering up this here blessed old dowager petty larcenerer,’—Mr Squeers delivered himself of this epithet with great difficulty and effort,—’and Dotheboys Hall a-running itself regularly to seed the while!
  • (Miss Squeers hesitated a long time for this last epithet, and brought it out triumphantly as last, as if it quite clinched the business.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: racial epithet Define
an insulting or abusive word or phrase
as in: earned the epithet, "The Great" Define
a descriptor added to a person's name -- as in Alexander The Great or: a phrase used in place of a name or word -- such as:
  • The Big Apple for New York
  • The Great Emancipator for Abraham Lincoln
  • man's best friend for dog

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