To better see all uses of the word
induce
in
Mansfield Park
please enable javascript.

induce
Used In
Mansfield Park
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • It did not suit his sense of propriety, and he was silenced, till induced by further smiles and liveliness to put the matter by for the present.
  • Edmund was the only one of the family who could see a fault in the business; but no representation of his aunt’s could induce him to find Mr. Rushworth a desirable companion.

  • Show more
  • Much was said on his side to induce her to attend the races, and schemes were made for a large party to them, with all the eagerness of inclination, but it would only do to be talked of.
  • He acknowledged no such inducement, and his sister ought to have given him credit for better feelings than her own.
  • And had I had an idea of it, nothing should have induced me to accept the necklace.
  • Maria’s guilt had induced Julia’s folly.
  • If by any officious exertions of his, she is induced to leave Henry’s protection, there will be much less chance of his marrying her than if she remain with him.
  • Tom’s extreme impatience to be removed to Mansfield, and experience those comforts of home and family which had been little thought of in uninterrupted health, had probably induced his being conveyed thither too early, as a return of fever came on, and for a week he was in a more alarming state than ever.
  • Sir Thomas had been amusing himself with shaping a very complete outline of the business; and as soon as she would listen quietly, could read his list of the families to be invited, from whom he calculated, with all necessary allowance for the shortness of the notice, to collect young people enough to form twelve or fourteen couple: and could detail the considerations which had induced him to fix on the 22nd as the most eligible day.
  • She hoped to marry him, and they continued together till she was obliged to be convinced that such hope was vain, and till the disappointment and wretchedness arising from the conviction rendered her temper so bad, and her feelings for him so like hatred, as to make them for a while each other’s punishment, and then induce a voluntary separation.

  • Show more again
  • CHAPTER XXXV Edmund had determined that it belonged entirely to Fanny to chuse whether her situation with regard to Crawford should be mentioned between them or not; and that if she did not lead the way, it should never be touched on by him; but after a day or two of mutual reserve, he was induced by his father to change his mind, and try what his influence might do for his friend.
  • When he had really resolved on any measure, he could always carry it through; and now by dint of long talking on the subject, explaining and dwelling on the duty of Fanny’s sometimes seeing her family, he did induce his wife to let her go; obtaining it rather from submission, however, than conviction, for Lady Bertram was convinced of very little more than that Sir Thomas thought Fanny ought to go, and therefore that she must.

  • There are no more uses of "induce" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: induce symptoms Define
to cause something to arise or happen
as in: induce him to Define
to persuade somebody to do something
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading