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minuteness
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Far from the Madding Crowd
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minuteness
Used In
Far from the Madding Crowd
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unspecified meaning
  • Gabriel had not beheld the sight for more than half a minute, when the vehicle was brought to a standstill just beneath his eyes.
  • If you will wait a minute, Bathsheba will be in.

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  • The smaller of its hands, too, occasionally slipped round on the pivot, and thus, though the minutes were told with precision, nobody could be quite certain of the hour they belonged to.
  • In feeling for each other’s palm in the gloom before the money could be passed, a minute incident occurred which told much.
  • Twere blush, blush, blush with me every minute of the time, when she was speaking to me.
  • "There—Mrs. Coggan is going!" said Bathsheba, exhaling her relief in the form of a long breath which had lain in her bosom a minute or more.
  • "I’ll see, sir," said Mrs. Coggan, and in a minute appeared in the room.
  • Gabriel, at that minute, descended the hill towards the right.
  • —I thought that church with the spire was All Saints’, and I was at the door at half-past eleven to a minute as you said.
  • A few minutes later, when the remaining ones were on their legs and about to depart, Fray came back again in a hurry.

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  • I met the mail-cart ten minutes ago, and a letter was put into my hand, which I opened without reading the address.
  • The silence grew to be a noticeable thing as the minutes went on, and nobody else appeared, and not a soul moved.
  • The result from capital employed in the production of any movement of a mental nature is sometimes as tremendous as the cause itself is absurdly minute.
  • Nor will I for a minute.
  • Twenty minutes.
  • It was hardly credible that the jack had not got wrong with the minutes when the rattle began again, the puppet emerged, and the four quarters were struck fitfully as before.
  • She might have looked her thanks to Gabriel on a minute scale, but she did not speak them; more probably she felt none, for in gaining her a passage he had lost her her point, and we know how women take a favour of that kind.
  • Closing the slide to windward, he turned to open the other; on second thoughts the farmer considered that he would first sit down leaving both closed for a minute or two, till the temperature of the hut was a little raised.
  • In a minute they had vanished through the gate, and she stood alone with the dying flock.
  • She made use of an unobserved minute whilst his attention was absorbed in the operation to arrange her plumes a little.
  • What you call encouragement was the childish game of an idle minute.
  • Gabriel, for a minute, rose above his own grief in noticing Boldwood’s.
  • Here, after the lapse of a few minutes, several more fell down, and lay helpless and livid as the rest.
  • Tall scrambled off to the field, and in two minutes was on Poll, the bay, bare-backed, and with only a halter by way of rein.
  • Three-and-twenty minutes and a half since you took the first lock from its forehead.
  • "It will not take five minutes," said Troy.
  • A few minutes after eleven had struck, Maryann turned in her bed with a sense of being disturbed.
  • Less than five minutes brought up Oak again, running at the same pace, with two halters dangling from his hand.
  • Weatherbury Bottom was reached in three or four minutes.
  • I could neither wake Maryann nor get into the house, though I hammered for ten minutes against her window-sill.
  • In ten minutes he was back again, and made as if he were going to call upon Troy at the carrier’s.
  • In two minutes a light appeared in the passage.
  • In a few minutes they moved on again towards the house.
  • In ten minutes every wind of heaven seemed to be roaming at large.
  • Here she lay, a shapeless heap, for ten minutes and more.
  • There was then a silence everywhere for four or five minutes, and the crunch of the spars, as Gabriel hastily drove them in, could again be distinctly heard.
  • No, no; wait a minute.
  • He carried a lantern in his hand, and closing the door behind him, came forward and busied himself about this nook of the field for nearly twenty minutes, the lantern light appearing and disappearing here and there, and brightening him or darkening him as he stood before or behind it.
  • The creeping plants about the old manor-house were bowed with rows of heavy water drops, which had upon objects behind them the effect of minute lenses of high magnifying power.
  • The sensation may be caused by the panoramic glide of the stars past earthly objects, which is perceptible in a few minutes of stillness, or by the better outlook upon space that a hill affords, or by the wind, or by the solitude; but whatever be its origin, the impression of riding along is vivid and abiding.
  • "But, dear me, I had better go back for my bag, because my slippers and brush and comb are in it; you run home whilst I fetch it, and I’ll promise to be in your parlour in ten minutes."
  • That minute’s interval had brought the blood beating into her face, set her stinging as if aflame to the very hollows of her feet, and enlarged emotion to a compass which quite swamped thought.
  • There was not a sound of life save that acme and sublimation of all dismal sounds, the bark of a fox, its three hollow notes being rendered at intervals of a minute with the precision of a funeral bell.
  • Ten minutes later his lonely figure might have been seen dragging four large water-proof coverings across the yard, and soon two of these heaps of treasure in grain were covered snug—two cloths to each.
  • She waited one minute—two minutes—thought of Troy’s disappointment at her non-fulfilment of a promised engagement, till she again ran along the field, clambered over the bank, and followed the original direction.
  • She waited one minute—two minutes—thought of Troy’s disappointment at her non-fulfilment of a promised engagement, till she again ran along the field, clambered over the bank, and followed the original direction.
  • Here she could see some object which circumstances proved to be a vehicle, for after a few minutes spent apparently in harnessing, she heard the trot of the horse down the road, mingled with the sound of light wheels.
  • The low though extensive hall, supported by beams and pillars, and latterly dignified by the name of Corn Exchange, was thronged with hot men who talked among each other in twos and threes, the speaker of the minute looking sideways into his auditor’s face and concentrating his argument by a contraction of one eyelid during delivery.
  • If I could only look in upon you for one little minute, I should know all!
  • Boldwood and Gabriel called to him, spoke to him for a few minutes, and then all three parted, Joseph immediately coming up the hill with his barrow.
  • In five or ten minutes there was another tap at the door.
  • In about ten minutes they returned to the house by a circuitous route, entering at the rear.
  • Troy deposited his basket beside the tomb, and vanished for a few minutes.
  • He would annihilate the six years of his life as if they were minutes—so little did he value his time on earth beside her love.
  • It was some minutes before he could counteract his sudden wish to go in, and claim her.
  • We met here a few minutes ago.
  • The doctor went in, and after a few minutes returned to the landing again, where Oak and the parson still waited.
  • "A few minutes, ma’am," said Oak, respectfully.
  • Ten minutes later a large and a smaller umbrella might have been seen moving from the same door, and through the mist along the road to the church.
  • In a few minutes she noticed the fat red nape of Coggan’s neck among those standing just below her, and Joseph Poorgrass’s saintly profile a little further on.
  • Liddy vanished, and at the end of twenty minutes returned with a cloak, hat, some slices of bread and butter, a tea-cup, and some hot tea in a little china jug.
  • She was in a state of mental gutta serena; her mind was for the minute totally deprived of light at the same time no obscuration was apparent from without.
  • This point-blank query unmistakably confused her, and it was not till a minute or more had elapsed that she said, "I have not seriously thought of any such subject."
  • The minutes glided by uncounted, until the evening shades began perceptibly to deepen, and the eyes of the three were but sparkling points on the surface of darkness.
  • Yet in the centremost parts of her complicated heart there existed at this minute a little pang of disappointment, for a reason she would not allow herself to recognize.
  • Boldwood remained silent after that, and the noise from indoors was again just audible, until, a few minutes later, light wheels could be distinguished coming down the hill.
  • On reaching Casterbridge he left the horse and trap at an inn, and at five minutes before ten came back to the bridge at the lower end of the town, and sat himself upon the parapet.
  • Of those out of the house Oak was one of the first to hear of the catastrophe, and when he entered the room, which was about five minutes after Boldwood’s exit, the scene was terrible.
  • Backing their oars and putting the boat about, they pulled towards him with a will, and in five or six minutes from the time of his first halloo, two of the sailors hauled him in over the stern.
  • Nevertheless, at twenty minutes to ten o’clock, Oak came out of his house, and Went up the hill side With that sort of stride A man puts out when walking in search of a bride, and knocked Bathsheba’s door.
  • In three minutes, without pause or modification, she had written a letter to Boldwood, at his address beyond Casterbridge, saying mildly but firmly that she had well considered the whole subject he had brought before her and kindly given her time to decide upon; that her final decision was that she could not marry him.
  • As the clock over the South-street Alms-house pointed to five minutes to three, a blue spring waggon, picked out with red, and containing boughs and flowers, passed the end of the street, and up towards this side of the building.
  • She had been hoping that Oak might appear, whose assistance in such cases was always accepted as an inalienable right, but Oak was nowhere to be seen; and hence it was that she said, "Then if you will just look in first, to see if there’s room, I think I will go in for a minute or two."
  • Oak may have had the best of intentions in withholding for as many days as possible the details of what had happened to Fanny; but had he known that Bathsheba’s perceptions had already been exercised in the matter, he would have done nothing to lengthen the minutes of suspense she was now undergoing, when the certainty which must terminate it would be the worst fact suspected after all.
  • "Come," said Gabriel, freshening again; "think a minute or two.
  • His mistress came up and looked upon them in silence for a minute or two; then she said— "Cain, go to the lower mead and catch the bay mare.
  • But only a few minutes, because ’tis as ’tis."
  • Let’s look into Warren’s for a few minutes first, shall us, neighbours?"
  • Why, he’ll go on to her himself in a few minutes, ye’ll see."

  • There are no more uses of "minuteness" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a minute amount Define
very, very small
as in: keep the minutes Define
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
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