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direct
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Emma
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direct
Used In
Emma
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unspecified meaning
  • It was most convenient to Emma not to make a direct reply to this assertion; she chose rather to take up her own line of the subject again.
  • If she can hesitate as to ’Yes,’ she ought to say ’No’ directly.

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  • He lived about a mile from Highbury, was a frequent visitor, and always welcome, and at this time more welcome than usual, as coming directly from their mutual connexions in London.
  • But you have not an idea of what is requisite in situations directly opposite to your own.
  • " Emma’s politeness was at hand directly, to say, with smiling interest— "Have you heard from Miss Fairfax so lately?
  • Mrs. Dixon has persuaded her father and mother to come over and see her directly.
  • I wish you would try to understand what an amiable young man may be likely to feel in directly opposing those, whom as child and boy he has been looking up to all his life.
  • Emma wished to go to work directly, and therefore produced the portfolio containing her various attempts at portraits, for not one of them had ever been finished, that they might decide together on the best size for Harriet.
  • I met the letters in my way this morning, and seeing my son’s hand, presumed to open it—though it was not directed to me—it was to Mrs. Weston.
  • My dear sir, upon no account in the world; my father can direct me.

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  • And so you absolutely opened what was directed to her!
  • And Miss Bates was obliged to give a direct answer before he would hear her in any thing else.
  • Mrs. Weston undertakes to direct the whole.
  • There will be the leg to be salted, you know, which is so very nice, and the loin to be dressed directly in any manner they like.
  • I was sitting near the door—Elizabeth saw me directly; but he did not; he was busy with the umbrella.
  • Emma was directly sure that he knew how to make himself agreeable; the conviction was strengthened by what followed.
  • They walked thither directly.
  • Emma’s going away directly after tea might be giving offence.
  • But I shall want the ribbon directly—so it had better go to Hartfield—at least the ribbon.
  • And then, to prevent farther outrage and indignation, changed the subject directly.
  • And she appears so truly good—there is something so motherly and kind-hearted about her, that it wins upon one directly.
  • Ah! there I am—thinking of him directly.
  • I hope you turned directly.
  • Your description of Mrs. Churchill made me think of them directly.
  • He did not omit being sometimes directly before Miss Smith, or speaking to those who were close to her.
  • I shall just go round by Mrs. Cole’s; but I shall not stop three minutes: and, Jane, you had better go home directly—I would not have you out in a shower!
  • I am sure she saw me, but she looked away directly, and took no notice; and they both went to quite the farther end of the shop; and I kept sitting near the door!
  • She was pondering, in the meanwhile, upon the possibility, without seeming very rude, of making her escape from Jane Fairfax’s letter, and had almost resolved on hurrying away directly under some slight excuse, when Miss Bates turned to her again and seized her attention.
  • Emma assured her there would be no difficulty in the answer, and advised its being written directly, which was agreed to, in the hope of her assistance; and though Emma continued to protest against any assistance being wanted, it was in fact given in the formation of every sentence.
  • And so she began inquiring after her directly, saying, ’I know you cannot have heard from Jane lately, because it is not her time for writing;’ and when I immediately said, ’But indeed we have, we had a letter this very morning,’ I do not know that I ever saw any body more surprized.
  • Emma saw Mrs. Weston’s surprize, and felt that it must be great, at an address which, in words and manner, was assuming to himself the right of first interest in her; and as for herself, she was too much provoked and offended to have the power of directly saying any thing to the purpose.
  • It must be done directly; it must be done in London; the order must go through the hands of some intelligent person whose taste could be depended on; and Isabella, the usual doer of all commissions, must not be applied to, because it was December, and Mr. Woodhouse could not bear the idea of her stirring out of her house in the fogs of December.
  • Mr. Weston directed the whole, officiating safely between Hartfield and the Vicarage, and every body was in good time.
  • What you direct in this house cannot be wrong.
  • I always deserve the best treatment, because I never put up with any other; and, therefore, you must give me a plain, direct answer.
  • —My aunt is not aware how late it is, nor how long we have been absent—but I am sure we shall be wanted, and I am determined to go directly.
  • Something of a very unpleasant nature, I find, has occurred;—do let me know directly what it is.
  • How directly, how strongly had he expressed himself to her on the subject!
  • She would not allow any other anxiety to succeed directly to the place in her mind which Harriet had occupied.
  • Emma felt that she could not do better than go home directly.
  • Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor’s judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
  • You may guess how readily he came into my wishes; and having his approbation, I made my way directly to Miss Bates, to assure her that the carriage would be at her service before it took us home; for I thought it would be making her comfortable at once.
  • —Was it new for any thing in this world to be unequal, inconsistent, incongruous—or for chance and circumstance (as second causes) to direct the human fate?
  • In he walked, the first and the handsomest; and after paying his compliments en passant to Miss Bates and her niece, made his way directly to the opposite side of the circle, where sat Miss Woodhouse; and till he could find a seat by her, would not sit at all.
  • And when I brought out the baked apples from the closet, and hoped our friends would be so very obliging as to take some, ’Oh!’ said he directly, ’there is nothing in the way of fruit half so good, and these are the finest-looking home-baked apples I ever saw in my life.’
  • Common sense would have directed her to tell Harriet, that she must not allow herself to think of him, and that there were five hundred chances to one against his ever caring for her.
  • He had ridden home through the rain; and had walked up directly after dinner, to see how this sweetest and best of all creatures, faultless in spite of all her faults, bore the discovery.
  • Emma, on reaching home, called the housekeeper directly, to an examination of her stores; and some arrowroot of very superior quality was speedily despatched to Miss Bates with a most friendly note.
  • He began—stopping, however, almost directly to say, "Had I been offered the sight of one of this gentleman’s letters to his mother-in-law a few months ago, Emma, it would not have been taken with such indifference."
  • She had heard, as soon as she got back to Mrs. Goddard’s, that Mr. Martin had been there an hour before, and finding she was not at home, nor particularly expected, had left a little parcel for her from one of his sisters, and gone away; and on opening this parcel, she had actually found, besides the two songs which she had lent Elizabeth to copy, a letter to herself; and this letter was from him, from Mr. Martin, and contained a direct proposal of marriage.
  • This gallant young man, who seemed to love without feeling, and to recommend himself without complaisance, directly handed over the word to Miss Fairfax, and with a particular degree of sedate civility entreated her to study it.
  • If meant to be immediately mixed with the others, and buried from sight, she should have looked on the table instead of looking just across, for it was not mixed; and Harriet, eager after every fresh word, and finding out none, directly took it up, and fell to work.
  • …as a week, which must make it very strange to be in different kingdoms, I was going to say, but however different countries, and so she wrote a very urgent letter to her mother—or her father, I declare I do not know which it was, but we shall see presently in Jane’s letter—wrote in Mr. Dixon’s name as well as her own, to press their coming over directly, and they would give them the meeting in Dublin, and take them back to their country seat, Baly-craig, a beautiful place, I fancy.
  • …felt, of the advantage of such an addition to their confined society in Surry; the pleasure of looking at somebody new; the gala-day to Highbury entire, which the sight of him would have made; and ending with reflections on the Churchills again, found herself directly involved in a disagreement with Mr. Knightley; and, to her great amusement, perceived that she was taking the other side of the question from her real opinion, and making use of Mrs. Weston’s arguments against herself.
  • Only half an hour before her friend called for her at Mrs. Goddard’s, her evil stars had led her to the very spot where, at that moment, a trunk, directed to The Rev. Philip Elton, White-Hart, Bath, was to be seen under the operation of being lifted into the butcher’s cart, which was to convey it to where the coaches past; and every thing in this world, excepting that trunk and the direction, was consequently a blank.
  • …been afraid it would pour down every moment—but she thought she might get to Hartfield first—she had hurried on as fast as possible; but then, as she was passing by the house where a young woman was making up a gown for her, she thought she would just step in and see how it went on; and though she did not seem to stay half a moment there, soon after she came out it began to rain, and she did not know what to do; so she ran on directly, as fast as she could, and took shelter at Ford’s.
  • …and that Mr. Churchill had sent his nephew a few lines, containing, upon the whole, a tolerable account of Mrs. Churchill, and only wishing him not to delay coming back beyond the next morning early; but that Mr. Frank Churchill having resolved to go home directly, without waiting at all, and his horse seeming to have got a cold, Tom had been sent off immediately for the Crown chaise, and the ostler had stood out and seen it pass by, the boy going a good pace, and driving very steady.
  • …her last; and adding, that as silence on such a point could not be misconstrued, and as it must be equally desirable to both to have every subordinate arrangement concluded as soon as possible, she now sent me, by a safe conveyance, all my letters, and requested, that if I could not directly command hers, so as to send them to Highbury within a week, I would forward them after that period to her at—: in short, the full direction to Mr. Smallridge’s, near Bristol, stared me in the face.
  • "You had better order the carriage directly, my love," said she; "I dare say we shall be able to get along, if we set off directly; and if we do come to any thing very bad, I can get out and walk.
  • "You had better order the carriage directly, my love," said she; "I dare say we shall be able to get along, if we set off directly; and if we do come to any thing very bad, I can get out and walk.
  • He had just read Elton’s letter as I was shewn in, and handed it to me directly."
  • A situation such as you deserve, and your friends would require for you, is no everyday occurrence, is not obtained at a moment’s notice; indeed, indeed, we must begin inquiring directly."
  • There was no bearing such an "always;" and to break through her dreadful gratitude, Emma made the direct inquiry of— "Where—may I ask?
  • It does relate to him, and I will tell you directly;" (resuming her work, and seeming resolved against looking up.
  • —Mr. Knightley immediately got up, and in a manner decidedly graver than usual, said, "I would not go away without seeing you, but I have no time to spare, and therefore must now be gone directly.
  • —This letter tells us—it is a short letter—written in a hurry, merely to give us notice—it tells us that they are all coming up to town directly, on Mrs. Churchill’s account—she has not been well the whole winter, and thinks Enscombe too cold for her—so they are all to move southward without loss of time."
  • And having gone through what immediately followed of the basis of their disagreement, and his persisting to act in direct opposition to Jane Fairfax’s sense of right, he made a fuller pause to say, "This is very bad.

  • There are no more uses of "direct" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: walked directly to work Define
proceeding without interruption in the straightest or quickest possible manner
as in: directly above; or buy direct from Define
straight (exactly where stated; or without anything in between)
as in: was direct in my instructions Define
straightforward (clear and explicit -- perhaps also indicating openness and honesty)
as in: directed her question to Define
aim or focus
as in: directed the jury to... Define
give instructions or commands (directions that must be followed)
as in: directed the movie Define
supervise or administer (often while giving directions or orders)
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