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  • The danger, however, was at present so unperceived, that they did not by any means rank as misfortunes with her.
  • From the expense of the child, however, he was soon relieved.

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  • However, I do not mean to set up my opinion against yours—and I am sure I shall not wish for the acquaintance of his wife.
  • We will not despair, however.
  • This letter, however, was written, and sealed, and sent.
  • And if I did, (which, however, I am far from allowing) I should not feel that I had done wrong.
  • She was not so materially cast down, however, but that a little time and the return of Harriet were very adequate restoratives.
  • The very next day however produced some proof of inspiration.
  • The wants and sufferings of the poor family, however, were the first subject on meeting.
  • However, it was an exceeding good, pretty letter, and gave Mr. and Mrs. Weston a great deal of pleasure.

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  • I could have wished, however, as you know, that you had seen Mr. Wingfield before you left home.
  • The only way of proving it, however, will be to turn to our maps.
  • His manners, however, must have been unmarked, wavering, dubious, or she could not have been so misled.
  • Now, however, we must wish you and Mrs. Bates good morning.
  • Still, however, affection was glad to catch at any reasonable excuse for not hurrying on the wretched moment.
  • After an interval of some minutes, however, he began with, "I shall always be very sorry that you went to the sea this autumn, instead of coming here."
  • However, when I read on, I found it was not near so bad as I had fancied at first; and I make so light of it now to her, that she does not think much about it.
  • They might advance rapidly if they would, however; they must advance somehow or other whether they would or no. She hardly wished to have more leisure for them.
  • The beginning, however, of every visit displayed none but the properest feelings, and this being of necessity so short might be hoped to pass away in unsullied cordiality.
  • It did, however.
  • It was not likely, however, that any body should have equalled her in the date of the plan, as it had entered her brain during the very first evening of Harriet’s coming to Hartfield.
  • His ostensible reason, however, was to ask whether Mr. Woodhouse’s party could be made up in the evening without him, or whether he should be in the smallest degree necessary at Hartfield.
  • This does not apply, however, to Miss Bates; she is only too good natured and too silly to suit me; but, in general, she is very much to the taste of every body, though single and though poor.
  • It was not closed, however, it still remained ajar; but by engaging the housekeeper in incessant conversation, she hoped to make it practicable for him to chuse his own subject in the adjoining room.
  • She gained on them, however, involuntarily: the child’s pace was quick, and theirs rather slow; and she was the more concerned at it, from their being evidently in a conversation which interested them.
  • However, she will not find her grandmama at all deafer than she was two years ago; which is saying a great deal at my mother’s time of life—and it really is full two years, you know, since she was here.
  • However, I do really think Mr. Martin a very amiable young man, and have a great opinion of him; and his being so much attached to me—and his writing such a letter—but as to leaving you, it is what I would not do upon any consideration.
  • Still, however, though every thing had not been accomplished by her ingenious device, she could not but flatter herself that it had been the occasion of much present enjoyment to both, and must be leading them forward to the great event.
  • It did her no service however.
  • However, she is very agreeable, and Mrs. Bates too, in a different way.
  • Mr. Elton’s rights, however, gradually revived.
  • The pain of his continued residence in Highbury, however, must certainly be lessened by his marriage.
  • —was a question, however, which did not augur much.
  • He could be no judge, however, of the evil he was holding cheap.
  • I do not mean to say, however, that you might not have made discoveries.
  • Another song, however, was soon begged for.
  • We have apple-dumplings, however, very often.
  • Busy as he was, however, the young man was yet able to shew a most happy countenance on seeing Emma again.
  • —Still, however, having proceeded so far, one is unwilling to give the matter up.
  • However, this does make a difference; and, perhaps, when we come to talk it over—but these sort of things require a good deal of consideration.
  • One perplexity, however, arose, which the gentlemen did not disdain.
  • Enscombe however was gracious, gracious in fact, if not in word.
  • A very few minutes more, however, completed the present trial.
  • Mr. Knightley, however, shewed no triumphant happiness.
  • — Still, however, I must be on my guard.
  • However, she seems a very obliging, pretty-behaved young lady, and no doubt will make him a very good wife.
  • However, my resolution is taken as to noticing Jane Fairfax.
  • — The preparatory interest of this dinner, however, was not yet over.
  • There was one, however, which Emma thought something of.
  • Escape, however, was not his plan.
  • I perfectly understand your situation, however, Miss Woodhouse—(looking towards Mr. Woodhouse), Your father’s state of health must be a great drawback.
  • Emma’s sense of right however had decided it; and besides the consideration of what was due to each brother, she had particular pleasure, from the circumstance of the late disagreement between Mr. Knightley and herself, in procuring him the proper invitation.
  • Miss Churchill, however, being of age, and with the full command of her fortune—though her fortune bore no proportion to the family-estate—was not to be dissuaded from the marriage, and it took place, to the infinite mortification of Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, who threw her off with due decorum.
  • The cold, however, was severe; and by the time the second carriage was in motion, a few flakes of snow were finding their way down, and the sky had the appearance of being so overcharged as to want only a milder air to produce a very white world in a very short time.
  • —The two Abbots and I ran into the front room and peeped through the blind when we heard he was going by, and Miss Nash came and scolded us away, and staid to look through herself; however, she called me back presently, and let me look too, which was very good-natured.
  • They were stopping, however, in the first place at Mrs. Bates’s; whose house was a little nearer Randalls than Ford’s; and had all but knocked, when Emma caught their eye.
  • But, however, I found afterwards from Patty, that William said it was all the apples of that sort his master had; he had brought them all—and now his master had not one left to bake or boil.
  • — In spite of this little rub, however, Emma was smiling with enjoyment, delighted to see the respectable length of the set as it was forming, and to feel that she had so many hours of unusual festivity before her.
  • It was not in compliment to Jane Fairfax however that he was so indifferent, or so indignant; he was not guided by her feelings in reprobating the ball, for she enjoyed the thought of it to an extraordinary degree.
  • —But however, she is so far from well, that her kind friends the Campbells think she had better come home, and try an air that always agrees with her; and they have no doubt that three or four months at Highbury will entirely cure her—and it is certainly a great deal better that she should come here, than go to Ireland, if she is unwell.
  • However, the very same evening William Larkins came over with a large basket of apples, the same sort of apples, a bushel at least, and I was very much obliged, and went down and spoke to William Larkins and said every thing, as you may suppose.
  • She did not do any of it in the same way that she used; I could see she was altered; but, however, she seemed to try to be very friendly, and we shook hands, and stood talking some time; but I know no more what I said—I was in such a tremble!
  • However, as they are so very desirous to have dear Emma dine with them, and as you will both be there, and Mr. Knightley too, to take care of her, I cannot wish to prevent it, provided the weather be what it ought, neither damp, nor cold, nor windy.
  • Every thing was to take its natural course, however, neither impelled nor assisted.
  • However, I assure you, Miss Woodhouse, I wish her no evil.
  • However, now I will destroy it all—and it is my particular wish to do it in your presence, that you may see how rational I am grown.
  • It is one that I shall never change, however.
  • Come on a donkey, however, if you prefer it.
  • Disputable, however, as might be the taste of such a termination, it was in itself a charming walk, and the view which closed it extremely pretty.
  • In two minutes, however, he relented in his own favour; and muttering something about spruce-beer, walked off.
  • Jane declined it, however, and the husband and wife walked off.
  • ’My dear,’ said I, ’I shall say you are laid down upon the bed:’ but, however, she is not; she is walking about the room.
  • However, I shall always think it a very pleasant party, and feel extremely obliged to the kind friends who included me in it.
  • —Let it stay, however,’ said she; ’give it houseroom till Colonel Campbell comes back.
  • Time, however, she thought, would tell him that they ought to be friends again.
  • Fortunately, however, it did cease.
  • — She must communicate the painful truth, however, and as soon as possible.
  • At least, however, I cannot be worse off than I should have been, if the other had been the person; and now—it is possible—
  • — When the suggestions of hope, however, which must follow here, presented themselves, she could not presume to indulge them.
  • Latterly, however—for some time, indeed—I have had no idea of their meaning any thing.
  • —I can suppose, however, that I may have underrated him.
  • —He had stayed on, however, vigorously, day after day—till this very morning’s post had conveyed the history of Jane Fairfax.
  • —It must be waded through, however.
  • Now, however, I see nothing in it but a very natural and consistent degree of discretion.
  • — I was mad enough, however, to resent.
  • —’His father’s disposition:’—he is unjust, however, to his father.
  • Part only of this answer, however, was admitted.
  • She promised, however, to think of it; and pretty nearly promised, moreover, to think of it, with the intention of finding it a very good scheme.
  • However, I think it answered so far as to tempt one to go again.
  • However, he is coming, I assure you: yes, indeed, on purpose to wait on you all.
  • —Not that I presume to insinuate, however, that some people may not think you perfection already.
  • She checked herself, however, and submitted quietly to a little more praise than she deserved.
  • —In ten minutes, however, the child had been perfectly well again.
  • The event, however, was most joyful; and every day was giving her fresh reason for thinking so.
  • Still, however, he was not happy.
  • As a sort of touchstone, however, she began to speak of his kindness in conveying the aunt and niece; and though his answer was in the spirit of cutting the matter short, she believed it to indicate only his disinclination to dwell on any kindness of his own.
  • She restrained herself, however, from any of the reproofs she could have given, and only thanked Mrs. Elton coolly; "but their going to Bath was quite out of the question; and she was not perfectly convinced that the place might suit her better than her father."
  • She went on, however.
  • It was done however.
  • Mr. Weston, however, too eager to be very observant, too communicative to want others to talk, was very well satisfied with what she did say, and soon moved away to make the rest of his friends happy by a partial communication of what the whole room must have overheard already.
  • I would not have you too sanguine; though, however it may end, be assured your raising your thoughts to him, is a mark of good taste which I shall always know how to value.
  • She had been particularly unwell, however, suffering from headache to a degree, which made her aunt declare, that had the ball taken place, she did not think Jane could have attended it; and it was charity to impute some of her unbecoming indifference to the languor of ill-health.
  • —The intention, however, was indubitable; and whether it was that his manners had in general so little gallantry, or however else it happened, but she thought nothing became him more.
  • —The intention, however, was indubitable; and whether it was that his manners had in general so little gallantry, or however else it happened, but she thought nothing became him more.
  • Gratifying, however, and stimulative as was the letter in the material part, its sentiments, she yet found, when it was folded up and returned to Mrs. Weston, that it had not added any lasting warmth, that she could still do without the writer, and that he must learn to do without her.
  • Mr. Knightley suspected in Frank Churchill the determination of catching her eye—he seemed watching her intently—in vain, however, if it were so— Jane passed between them into the hall, and looked at neither.
  • —They parted thorough friends, however; she could not be deceived as to the meaning of his countenance, and his unfinished gallantry;—it was all done to assure her that she had fully recovered his good opinion.
  • He began—stopping, however, almost directly to say, "Had I been offered the sight of one of this gentleman’s letters to his mother-in-law a few months ago, Emma, it would not have been taken with such indifference."
  • It was all read, however, steadily, attentively, and without the smallest remark; and, excepting one momentary glance at her, instantly withdrawn, in the fear of giving pain—no remembrance of Box Hill seemed to exist.
  • They continued together with unabated regard however, till the marriage of Miss Campbell, who by that chance, that luck which so often defies anticipation in matrimonial affairs, giving attraction to what is moderate rather than to what is superior, engaged the affections of Mr. Dixon, a young man, rich and agreeable, almost as soon as they were acquainted; and was eligibly and happily settled, while Jane Fairfax had yet her bread to earn.
  • Now, however, it was absolutely to be; every preparation was resumed, and very soon after the Churchills had removed to Richmond, a few lines from Frank, to say that his aunt felt already much better for the change, and that he had no doubt of being able to join them for twenty-four hours at any given time, induced them to name as early a day as possible.
  • —Before this second looking over was begun, however, Emma walked into the hall for the sake of a few moments’ free observation of the entrance and ground-plot of the house—and was hardly there, when Jane Fairfax appeared, coming quickly in from the garden, and with a look of escape.
  • Waiving that point, however, and supposing her to be, as you describe her, only pretty and good-natured, let me tell you, that in the degree she possesses them, they are not trivial recommendations to the world in general, for she is, in fact, a beautiful girl, and must be thought so by ninety-nine people out of an hundred; and till it appears that men are much more philosophic on the subject of beauty than they are generally supposed; till they do fall in love with well-informed minds…
  • …to go over till the summer, but she is so impatient to see them again—for till she married, last October, she was never away from them so much as a week, which must make it very strange to be in different kingdoms, I was going to say, but however different countries, and so she wrote a very urgent letter to her mother—or her father, I declare I do not know which it was, but we shall see presently in Jane’s letter—wrote in Mr. Dixon’s name as well as her own, to press their coming over…
  • He could not understand it; but there were symptoms of intelligence between them—he thought so at least—symptoms of admiration on his side, which, having once observed, he could not persuade himself to think entirely void of meaning, however he might wish to escape any of Emma’s errors of imagination.
  • She went, however; and when they reached the farm, and she was to be put down, at the end of the broad, neat gravel walk, which led between espalier apple-trees to the front door, the sight of every thing which had given her so much pleasure the autumn before, was beginning to revive a little local agitation; and when they parted, Emma observed her to be looking around with a sort of fearful curiosity, which determined her not to allow the visit to exceed the proposed quarter of an…
  • …her that he had been impatient to leave the dining-room—hated sitting long—was always the first to move when he could—that his father, Mr. Knightley, Mr. Cox, and Mr. Cole, were left very busy over parish business—that as long as he had staid, however, it had been pleasant enough, as he had found them in general a set of gentlemanlike, sensible men; and spoke so handsomely of Highbury altogether—thought it so abundant in agreeable families—that Emma began to feel she had been used to…
  • …the drawback of a single unpleasant surmise, without a glance forward at any possible treachery in his guest, give way to all his natural kind-hearted civility in solicitous inquiries after Mr. Frank Churchill’s accommodation on his journey, through the sad evils of sleeping two nights on the road, and express very genuine unmixed anxiety to know that he had certainly escaped catching cold—which, however, he could not allow him to feel quite assured of himself till after another night.
  • Some portion of respect for herself, however, in spite of all these demerits—some concern for her own appearance, and a strong sense of justice by Harriet—(there would be no need of compassion to the girl who believed herself loved by Mr. Knightley—but justice required that she should not be made unhappy by any coldness now,) gave Emma the resolution to sit and endure farther with calmness, with even apparent kindness.
  • Mr. Woodhouse agreed to it all, but added, "Our little friend Harriet Smith, however, is just such another pretty kind of young person.
  • While he talked to Isabella, however, Emma found an opportunity of saying, "And so you do not consider this visit from your son as by any means certain.
  • …she was not able to refrain from a start, or a heavy sigh, or even from walking about the room for a few seconds—and the only source whence any thing like consolation or composure could be drawn, was in the resolution of her own better conduct, and the hope that, however inferior in spirit and gaiety might be the following and every future winter of her life to the past, it would yet find her more rational, more acquainted with herself, and leave her less to regret when it were gone.
  • …the ostler on the subject, being the accumulation of the ostler’s own knowledge, and the knowledge of the servants at Randalls, was, that a messenger had come over from Richmond soon after the return of the party from Box Hill—which messenger, however, had been no more than was expected; and that Mr. Churchill had sent his nephew a few lines, containing, upon the whole, a tolerable account of Mrs. Churchill, and only wishing him not to delay coming back beyond the next morning early;…
  • In a moment he went on— "That will never be, however, I can assure you.
  • "And yet," said Emma, beginning hastily and with an arch look, but soon stopping—it was better, however, to know the worst at once—she hurried on—"And yet, perhaps, you may hardly be aware yourself how highly it is.
  • "You may well class the delight, the honour, and the comfort of such a situation together," said Jane, "they are pretty sure to be equal; however, I am very serious in not wishing any thing to be attempted at present for me.
  • "There appeared such a perfectly good understanding among them all—" he began rather quickly, but checking himself, added, "however, it is impossible for me to say on what terms they really were—how it might all be behind the scenes.
  • When Mr. Weston joined the party, however, and when the baby was fetched, there was no longer a want of subject or animation—or of courage and opportunity for Frank Churchill to draw near her and say, "I have to thank you, Miss Woodhouse, for a very kind forgiving message in one of Mrs. Weston’s letters.
  • "—Mrs. Churchill’s state, however, as many were ready to remind her, was liable to such sudden variation as might disappoint her nephew in the most reasonable dependence—and Mrs. Weston was at last persuaded to believe, or to say, that it must be by some attack of Mrs. Churchill that he was prevented coming.
  • When he came to Miss Woodhouse, he was obliged to read the whole of it aloud—all that related to her, with a smile; a look; a shake of the head; a word or two of assent, or disapprobation; or merely of love, as the subject required; concluding, however, seriously, and, after steady reflection, thus— "Very bad—though it might have been worse.
  • However, I must say, that Robert Martin’s heart seemed for him, and to me, very overflowing; and that he did mention, without its being much to the purpose, that on quitting their box at Astley’s, my brother took charge of Mrs. John Knightley and little John, and he followed with Miss Smith and Henry; and that at one time they were in such a crowd, as to make Miss Smith rather uneasy."

  • There are no more uses of "however" in the book.

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as in: However, complications may... Define
despite that (Used to connect contrasting ideas. Other synonyms could include in spite of that, nevertheless, nonetheless, and on the other hand.)
as in: However much she tried... Define
to whatever degree (regardless of how much)
as in: However you do it, get it done! Define
in whatever way
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