To better see all uses of the word
please enable javascript.

Used In
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • The boy had, with the additional softening claim of a lingering illness of his mother’s, been the means of a sort of reconciliation; and Mr. and Mrs. Churchill, having no children of their own, nor any other young creature of equal kindred to care for, offered to take the whole charge of the little Frank soon after her decease.
  • I hope he may long continue to feel all the value of such a reconciliation.

  • Show more
  • — Till this morning, we have not once met since the day of reconciliation.
  • But it is done; we are reconciled, dearer, much dearer, than ever, and no moment’s uneasiness can ever occur between us again.
  • Mr. Woodhouse could not be soon reconciled; but the worst was overcome, the idea was given; time and continual repetition must do the rest.
  • Even then, I was not such a fool as not to mean to be reconciled in time; but I was the injured person, injured by her coldness, and I went away determined that she should make the first advances.
  • She might assist his resolution, or reconcile him to it; she might give just praise to Harriet, or, by representing to him his own independence, relieve him from that state of indecision, which must be more intolerable than any alternative to such a mind as his.
  • Matrimony, as the origin of change, was always disagreeable; and he was by no means yet reconciled to his own daughter’s marrying, nor could ever speak of her but with compassion, though it had been entirely a match of affection, when he was now obliged to part with Miss Taylor too; and from his habits of gentle selfishness, and of being never able to suppose that other people could feel differently from himself, he was very much disposed to think Miss Taylor had done as sad a thing…
  • — I spoke; circumstances were in my favour; the late event had softened away his pride, and he was, earlier than I could have anticipated, wholly reconciled and complying; and could say at last, poor man! with a deep sigh, that he wished I might find as much happiness in the marriage state as he had done.
  • His companions suggested only what could palliate imprudence, or smooth objections; and by the time they had talked it all over together, and he had talked it all over again with Emma, in their walk back to Hartfield, he was become perfectly reconciled, and not far from thinking it the very best thing that Frank could possibly have done.

  • Show more again
  • …a good deal of agitation herself; and in the first place had wished not to go at all at present, to be allowed merely to write to Miss Fairfax instead, and to defer this ceremonious call till a little time had passed, and Mr. Churchill could be reconciled to the engagement’s becoming known; as, considering every thing, she thought such a visit could not be paid without leading to reports:—but Mr. Weston had thought differently; he was extremely anxious to shew his approbation to Miss…
  • "Well," said Emma, "I suppose we shall gradually grow reconciled to the idea, and I wish them very happy.
  • He wanted her to look up and smile; and having now brought herself not to smile too broadly—she did—cheerfully answering, "You need not be at any pains to reconcile me to the match.

  • There are no more uses of "reconcile" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: reconciled their differences Define
to bring into agreement (see word notes for more detailed definitions based on context)
as in: reconciled herself to Define
to come to terms with
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading