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coy
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coy
Used In
Dubliners
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unspecified meaning
  • "It doesn’t pain you now?" asked Mr. M’Coy.
  • He was quite unconscious that he was the victim of a plot which his friends, Mr. Cunningham, Mr. M’Coy and Mr. Power had disclosed to Mrs. Kernan in the parlour.

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  • Mr. M’Coy had been at one time a tenor of some reputation.
  • "Mucus." said Mr. M’Coy.
  • "Yes, yes," said Mr. M’Coy, "that’s the thorax."
  • "I suppose you squared the constable, Jack," said Mr. M’Coy.
  • Mr. M’Coy, who wanted to enter the conversation by any door, pretended that he had never heard the story.
  • "It’s better to have nothing to say to them," said Mr. M’Coy.
  • "We can meet in M’Auley’s," said Mr. M’Coy.
  • "We can meet at half-seven," said Mr. M’Coy.

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  • "Yes, that’s it," said Mr. Cunningham, "Jack and I and M’Coy here—we’re all going to wash the pot."
  • "And I own up," said Mr. M’Coy.
  • "Is that so?" asked Mr. M’Coy.
  • "The Jesuits cater for the upper classes," said Mr. M’Coy.
  • "Not like some of the other priesthoods on the continent," said Mr. M’Coy, "unworthy of the name."
  • Mr. M’Coy said: "Father Tom Burke, that was the boy!"
  • "Is that so?" said Mr. M’Coy.
  • "There’s not much difference between us," said Mr. M’Coy.
  • "O yes," said Mr. M’Coy, "Tenebrae."
  • Mr. M’Coy tasted his whisky contentedly and shook his head with a double intention, saying: "That’s no joke, I can tell you."
  • "We didn’t learn that, Tom," said Mr. Power, following Mr. M’Coy’s example, "when we went to the penny-a-week school."
  • "Well, you know," said Mr. M’Coy, "isn’t the photograph wonderful when you come to think of it?"
  • Mr. M’Coy, seeing that there was not enough to go round, pleaded that he had not finished his first measure.
  • "What’s that you were saying, Tom?" asked Mr. M’Coy.
  • "And what about Dowling?" asked Mr. M’Coy.
  • "O, don’t forget the candle, Tom," said Mr. M’Coy, "whatever you do."
  • In the bench behind sat Mr. M’Coy alone: and in the bench behind him sat Mr. Power and Mr. Fogarty.
  • "Ha!" said Mr. M’Coy.
  • Mr. M’Coy had tried unsuccessfully to find a place in the bench with the others, and, when the party had settled down in the form of a quincunx, he had tried unsuccessfully to make comic remarks.
  • He was not straight-laced, but he could not forget that Mr. M’Coy had recently made a crusade in search of valises and portmanteaus to enable Mrs. M’Coy to fulfil imaginary engagements in the country.
  • He was not straight-laced, but he could not forget that Mr. M’Coy had recently made a crusade in search of valises and portmanteaus to enable Mrs. M’Coy to fulfil imaginary engagements in the country.
  • "There’s no mistake about it," said Mr. M’Coy, "if you want a thing well done and no flies about, you go to a Jesuit.
  • he was a splendid man," said Mr. M’Coy.

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a coy, flirtatious smile Define
being or pretending to be shy
as in: coy about her intentions Define
being secretive or reluctant to make a definite or committing statement
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