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minuteness
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Dubliners
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minuteness
Used In
Dubliners
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
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unspecified meaning
  • When I had been sitting there for five or ten minutes I saw Mahony’s grey suit approaching.
  • When he was quite sure that the narrative had ended he laughed noiselessly for fully half a minute.

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  • In a few minutes the train drew up beside an improvised wooden platform.
  • He picked his way deftly through all that minute vermin-like life and under the shadow of the gaunt spectral mansions in which the old nobility of Dublin had roystered.
  • I passed out on to the road and saw by the lighted dial of a clock that it was ten minutes to ten.
  • Lenehan observed them for a few minutes.
  • It was seventeen minutes past eleven: she would have lots of time to have the matter out with Mr. Doran and then catch short twelve at Marlborough Street.
  • Some minutes passed.
  • He stood up slowly, saying that he had to leave us for a minute or so, a few minutes, and, without changing the direction of my gaze, I saw him walking slowly away from us towards the near end of the field.
  • He stood up slowly, saying that he had to leave us for a minute or so, a few minutes, and, without changing the direction of my gaze, I saw him walking slowly away from us towards the near end of the field.

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  • Three days’ reddish beard fringed his jaws and every two or three minutes a mist gathered on his glasses so that he had to take them off and polish them with his pocket-handkerchief.
  • "But won’t you come in and sit down a minute?"
  • Tell him we won’t keep it a minute.
  • The evening was falling and in a few minutes they would be lighting the gas: then he could write.
  • The man listened to the clicking of the machine for a few minutes and then set to work to finish his copy.
  • From Ballsbridge to the Pillar, twenty minutes; from the Pillar to Drumcondra, twenty minutes; and twenty minutes to buy the things.
  • From Ballsbridge to the Pillar, twenty minutes; from the Pillar to Drumcondra, twenty minutes; and twenty minutes to buy the things.
  • From Ballsbridge to the Pillar, twenty minutes; from the Pillar to Drumcondra, twenty minutes; and twenty minutes to buy the things.
  • He waited for some minutes listening.
  • "Why, blast your soul," said Mr. Henchy, "I’d get more votes in five minutes than you two’d get in a week."
  • In a few minutes an apologetic "Pok!" was heard as the cork flew out of Mr. Lyons’ bottle.
  • No, it was twenty minutes to eight.
  • Mr. Holohan came into the dressingroom every few minutes with reports from the box-office.
  • In two minutes he was surrounded by a ring of men.
  • In a few minutes the women began to come in by twos and threes, wiping their steaming hands in their petticoats and pulling down the sleeves of their blouses over their red steaming arms.
  • And Maria laughed again till the tip of her nose nearly met the tip of her chin and till her minute body nearly shook itself asunder because she knew that Mooney meant well though, of course, she had the notions of a common woman.
  • The lower teeth and gums were covered with clotted blood and a minute piece of the tongue seemed to have been bitten off.
  • "But only for ten minutes, Molly," said Mrs. Conroy.
  • "Very well," said Gabriel amiably, as he took another preparatory draught, "kindly forget my existence, ladies and gentlemen, for a few minutes."
  • Four young men, who had come from the refreshment-room to stand in the doorway at the sound of the piano, had gone away quietly in couples after a few minutes.
  • "I’d like nothing better this minute," said Mr. Browne stoutly, "than a rattling fine walk in the country or a fast drive with a good spanking goer between the shafts."
  • Freddy Malins always came late, but they wondered what could be keeping Gabriel: and that was what brought them every two minutes to the banisters to ask Lily had Gabriel or Freddy come.
  • After a silence of a few minutes I heard Mahony exclaim: "I say!
  • But if you wait a minute I’ll send round to Fogarty’s, at the corner."

  • There are no more uses of "minuteness" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: a minute amount Define
very, very small
as in: keep the minutes Define
a written record of what happened at a meeting
Show Multiple Meanings (More common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
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