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David Copperfield
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David Copperfield
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unspecified meaning
  • I shudder at this moment with the tremendous sensation of seeing it done, and feeling that the ball has bounded on to Mr. Creakle’s sacred head.
  • My passion for her is beyond all bounds.

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  • We approached it by degrees, and got, in due time, to the inn in the Whitechapel district, for which we were bound.
  • ’My first master will succeed me — I am in earnest at last — so you’ll soon have to arrange our contracts, and to bind us firmly to them, like a couple of knaves.’
  • This treasure, as in duty bound, I laid at the feet of Steerforth, and begged him to dispense.
  • ’His feelings will soon get the better of it, I’ll be bound.
  • ’I am bound to believe you, and of course I do believe you,’ said Mr. Wickfield.
  • I only observed that my mother was as far off from me as she could be, and kept her face another way so that I never saw it; and that Mr. Murdstone’s hand was bound up in a large linen wrapper.
  • He inquired, under a shed in the playground, into the particulars of my punishment, and was pleased to express his opinion that it was ’a jolly shame’; for which I became bound to him ever afterwards.
  • Do you think I don’t know what a woeful day it was for the soft little creature when you first came in her way — smirking and making great eyes at her, I’ll be bound, as if you couldn’t say boh! to a goose!’

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  • It was a trying thing to find people here, waiting for us; and my jealousy, even of the ladies, knew no bounds.
  • As to fitfulness, I have never learnt the art of binding myself to any of the wheels on which the Ixions of these days are turning round and round.
  • One morning when I went into the parlour with my books, I found my mother looking anxious, Miss Murdstone looking firm, and Mr. Murdstone binding something round the bottom of a cane — a lithe and limber cane, which he left off binding when I came in, and poised and switched in the air.
  • Up to mischief, I’ll be bound.
  • The idea did not originate in my own discernment, I am bound to confess, but in a speech of Rosa Dartle’s.
  • ’Well, Master Copperfield,’ he replied, ’you perceive I am not bound to answer that question.
  • ’I looked for single motives in everyone,’ said Mr. Wickfield, and I was satisfied I had bound him to me by motives of interest.
  • One morning when I went into the parlour with my books, I found my mother looking anxious, Miss Murdstone looking firm, and Mr. Murdstone binding something round the bottom of a cane — a lithe and limber cane, which he left off binding when I came in, and poised and switched in the air.
  • That although it was little else than a matter of form, I presumed I should have an opportunity of trying how I liked it, before I bound myself to it irrevocably.
  • As I felt bound to assist him in this, and also to mediate between them; with the view of sparing the mother’s feelings as much as possible, I wrote to her that night.
  • You are bound, in justice to your family, if not to yourself, to take in at a comprehensive glance the extremest point in the horizon to which your abilities may lead you.’
  • ’I am bound to state to you,’ he said, with an official air, ’that the business habits, and the prudent suggestions, of Mrs. Micawber, have in a great measure conduced to this result.
  • Moreover, she was rather what might be called wayward — I’ll go so far as to say what I should call wayward myself,’ said Mr. Omer; ’didn’t know her own mind quite — a little spoiled — and couldn’t, at first, exactly bind herself down.
  • He doen’t know wheer he’s going; he doen’t know —what’s afore him; he’s bound upon a voyage that’ll last, on and off, all the rest of his days, take my wured for ’t, unless he finds what he’s a seeking of.
  • Oh, my dear, it might have been a better fortune for you, if you had been fond of someone else — of someone steadier and much worthier than me, who was all bound up in you, and never vain and changeable like me!’
  • ’As I have mentioned to Miss Trotwood, I am actuated by no mercenary considerations; few men are less so, I believe; but Mr. Jorkins has his opinions on these subjects, and I am bound to respect Mr. Jorkins’s opinions.
  • Besides these, there were sundry immense manuscript Books of Evidence taken on affidavit, strongly bound, and tied together in massive sets, a set to each cause, as if every cause were a history in ten or twenty volumes.
  • CHAPTER 32 THE BEGINNING OF A LONG JOURNEY What is natural in me, is natural in many other men, I infer, and so I am not afraid to write that I never had loved Steerforth better than when the ties that bound me to him were broken.
  • Being a very honest little creature, and unwilling to disgrace the memory I was going to leave behind me at Murdstone and Grinby’s, I considered myself bound to remain until Saturday night; and, as I had been paid a week’s wages in advance when I first came there, not to present myself in the counting-house at the usual hour, to receive my stipend.
  • I then bound myself once more to the prescribed conditions.
  • We are bound to think of that.
  • The husband was come home, then; and the two together put her aboard a small trader bound to Leghorn, and from that to France.
  • I am bound to say that she has never done much for me, and that I have no particular wish upon the subject.’
  • ’And I am so grateful to you for it, Agnes, so bound to you, that there is no name for the affection of my heart.
  • If there’s slaves in them parts where you’re a-going, I’ll be bound to you for one, and happy, but doen’t ye leave me behind, Dan’l, that’s a deary dear!’
  • Britannia, that unfortunate female, is always before me, like a trussed fowl: skewered through and through with office-pens, and bound hand and foot with red tape.
  • But his easy, spirited good humour; his genial manner, his handsome looks, his natural gift of adapting himself to whomsoever he pleased, and making direct, when he cared to do it, to the main point of interest in anybody’s heart; bound her to him wholly in five minutes.
  • ’When I happened to say to that naughty thing, the other day,’ pursued her mother, shaking her head and her fan at her, playfully, ’that there was a family circumstance she might mention to you — indeed, I think, was bound to mention — she said, that to mention it was to ask a favour; and that, as you were too generous, and as for her to ask was always to have, she wouldn’t.’
  • Both became overshadowed by a new and indefinable horror; and when I awoke — or rather when I shook off the lethargy that bound me in my chair— my whole frame thrilled with objectless and unintelligible fear.
  • I bound myself by the required promise, in a most impassioned manner; called upon Traddles to witness it; and denounced myself as the most atrocious of characters if I ever swerved from it in the least degree.
  • His enemy, muttering to himself, after wringing his wounded hand for sometime, slowly drew off his neck-kerchief and bound it up; then held it in his other hand, and sat upon his table with his sullen face looking down.
  • He was so near, that with one more of his vigorous strokes he would be clinging to it, — when a high, green, vast hill-side of water, moving on shoreward, from beyond the ship, he seemed to leap up into it with a mighty bound, and the ship was gone!
  • I said to Annie, when Doctor Strong paid a very flattering visit to myself, and made her the subject of a declaration and an offer, I said, "My dear, there is no doubt whatever, in my opinion, with reference to a suitable provision for you, that Doctor Strong will do more than he binds himself to do."
  • However, it was so much to him that for India he was bound, and Julia with him; and Julia went into the country to take leave of her relations; and the house was put into a perfect suit of bills, announcing that it was to be let or sold, and that the furniture (Mangle and all) was to be taken at a valuation.
  • I brought the volume with me on my next visit (I got it prettily bound, first, to make it look less dry and more inviting); and as we strolled about the Common, I showed her an old housekeeping-book of my aunt’s, and gave her a set of tablets, and a pretty little pencil-case and box of leads, to practise housekeeping with.
  • If she were not true to it, might the object she now had in life, which bound her to something devoid of evil, in its passing away from her, leave her more forlorn and more despairing, if that were possible, than she had been upon the river’s brink that night; and then might all help, human and Divine, renounce her evermore!
  • CHAPTER 55 TEMPEST I now approach an event in my life, so indelible, so awful, so bound by an infinite variety of ties to all that has preceded it, in these pages, that, from the beginning of my narrative, I have seen it growing larger and larger as I advanced, like a great tower in a plain, and throwing its fore-cast shadow even on the incidents of my childish days.
  • Mr. W. being infirm, and it being within the bounds of probability that his decease might lead to some discoveries, and to the downfall of — HEEP’S — power over the W. family, — as I, Wilkins Micawber, the undersigned, assume — unless the filial affection of his daughter could be secretly influenced from allowing any investigation of the partnership affairs to be ever made, the said — HEEP — deemed it expedient to have a bond ready by him, as from Mr. W., for the before-mentioned sumů

  • There are no more uses of "bound" in the book.

To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: south-bound lanes Define
travelling in a particular direction or to a specific location
as in: She's bound to succeed. Define
almost certain to; or determined to
as in: bound together Define
held together (connected or united) or wrapped (see word notes for a more detailed definition based upon context)
as in: I can't/must. I'm bound by... Define
tied up, prevented, or required
as in: the binding is loose Define
something that holds things together, or wraps or covers or ties something
as in: It put me in a bind. Define
a difficult situation
as in: out of bounds; bounded on the east Define
a boundary or limit
as in: The deer bound across the trail. Define
to leap or jump
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