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apprehension
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David Copperfield
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apprehension
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David Copperfield
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unspecified meaning
  • My apprehensions were realized.
  • These thoughts, and a hundred other such thoughts, turned me burning hot, and made me giddy with apprehension and dismay.

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  • In the monotony of my life, and in my constant apprehension of the re-opening of the school, it was such an insupportable affliction!
  • As slumber gradually stole upon me, I heard the wind howling out at sea and coming on across the flat so fiercely, that I had a lazy apprehension of the great deep rising in the night.
  • The difficulty had not occurred to me; though I had had my apprehensions too, when I went in, of hearing the old tune.
  • I complied, in a very uncomfortable state, and with a warm shooting all over me, as if my apprehensions were breaking out into buds.
  • My word being passed to myself, there is no longer any apprehension; but I pledge it to you, too, with the greatest readiness.
  • All the evening his eyes wandered to my aunt’s face, with an expression of the most dismal apprehension, as if he saw her growing thin on the spot.
  • My apprehensions of being disparaged to the object of my engrossing affection were revived when we went into the drawing-room, by the grim and distant aspect of Miss Murdstone.
  • My quickness of apprehension seemed to please him, and he went on: ’Now I consider this is principally on account of her being in an unsettled state, you see.

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  • When she went out of the room with Miss Murdstone (no other ladies were of the party), I fell into a reverie, only disturbed by the cruel apprehension that Miss Murdstone would disparage me to her.
  • Mr. Micawber roused me from this reflection, which was blended with a certain remorseful apprehension of seeing Steerforth himself, by bestowing many encomiums on the absent Littimer as a most respectable fellow, and a thoroughly admirable servant.
  • It gave him a surprised look — not to say a hearth-broomy kind of expression — which, my apprehensions whispered, might be fatal to us.
  • Have no apprehensions for me, Trotwood,’ she added, after a moment; ’the step you dread my taking, I shall never take.’
  • ’I shall never, dear ladies,’ I exclaimed, relieved of an immense load of apprehension, ’forget your kindness!’
  • I was persuaded that I had an apprehension of his returning from Lowestoft by sea, and being lost.
  • Relieved of the incubus that had fastened upon him for so long a time, and of the dreadful apprehensions under which he had lived, he is hardly the same person.
  • I watched him as he grew — and he grew like scarlet beans — with painful apprehensions of the time when he would begin to shave; even of the days when he would be bald or grey.
  • Mr. Micawber withdrew, and was absent some little time; in the course of which Mrs. Micawber was not wholly free from an apprehension that words might have arisen between him and the Member.
  • I picture myself coming downstairs in the morning, and looking through a long ghastly gash of a staircase window at the school-bell hanging on the top of an out-house with a weathercock above it; and dreading the time when it shall ring J. Steerforth and the rest to work: which is only second, in my foreboding apprehensions, to the time when the man with the wooden leg shall unlock the rusty gate to give admission to the awful Mr. Creakle.
  • No matter how incidentally or naturally I endeavoured to form my little wife’s mind, I could not help seeing that she always had an instinctive perception of what I was about, and became a prey to the keenest apprehensions.
  • Many times, in the dark part of the night (it was then late in September, when the nights were not short), the leaders turned about, or came to a dead stop; and we were often in serious apprehension that the coach would be blown over.
  • All my old doubts and apprehensions on that subject, all the Doctor’s happiness and peace, all the mingled possibilities of innocence and compromise, that I could not unravel, I saw, in a moment, at the mercy of this fellow’s twisting.
  • I was in several minds how to dress myself on the important day; being divided between my desire to appear to advantage, and my apprehensions of putting on anything that might impair my severely practical character in the eyes of the Misses Spenlow.
  • ’Now, I may be wrong in my conclusions; it is very likely that I am, but my individual impression is, that the gulf between my family and Mr. Micawber may be traced to an apprehension, on the part of my family, that Mr. Micawber would require pecuniary accommodation.
  • After a little further conversation, we went round to the chandler’s shop, to enlist Peggotty; Traddles declining to pass the evening with me, both because he endured the liveliest apprehensions that his property would be bought by somebody else before he could re-purchase it, and because it was the evening he always devoted to writing to the dearest girl in the world.
  • At length, confused by fright and heat, and doubting whether half London might not by this time be turning out for my apprehension, I left the young man to go where he would with my box and money; and, panting and crying, but never stopping, faced about for Greenwich, which I had understood was on the Dover Road: taking very little more out of the world, towards the retreat of my aunt, Miss Betsey, than I had brought into it, on the night when my arrival gave her so much umbrage.
  • This Christmas-time being come, and Agnes having reposed no new confidence in me, a doubt that had several times arisen in my mind — whether she could have that perception of the true state of my breast, which restrained her with the apprehension of giving me pain — began to oppress me heavily.
  • The cause of the late change in you, which I have seen with so much pain and sorrow, and have sometimes referred to my old apprehension — at other times to lingering suppositions nearer to the truth — has been made clear tonight; and by an accident I have also come to know, tonight, the full measure of your noble trust in me, even under that mistake.
  • I trust that the labour and hazard of an investigation — of which the smallest results have been slowly pieced together, in the pressure of arduous avocations, under grinding penurious apprehensions, at rise of morn, at dewy eve, in the shadows of night, under the watchful eye of one whom it were superfluous to call Demon — combined with the struggle of parental Poverty to turn it, when completed, to the right account, may be as the sprinkling of a few drops of sweet water on my…

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To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: apprehension about finals Define
worry about what is to come
as in: apprehension of the criminal Define
the capture of a criminal
as in: conscious apprehension is limited Define
to understand or: in psychology and philosophy: immediate awareness prior to analysis and judgment
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