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sober
in
David Copperfield
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sober
Used In
David Copperfield
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unspecified meaning
  • These Doctors’ Commons fellows are the gayest men in town, I believe, and beat us sober Oxford people all to nothing!’
  • Coming into Canterbury, I loitered through the old streets with a sober pleasure that calmed my spirits, and eased my heart.

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  • He was a sober, steady-looking young man of retiring manners, with a comic head of hair, and eyes that were rather wide open; and he got into an obscure corner so soon, that I had some difficulty in making him out.
  • Finding by degrees, however, that I was sober, and (I hope) that I was a modest young gentleman, Mrs. Waterbrook softened towards me considerably, and inquired, firstly, if I went much into the parks, and secondly, if I went much into society.
  • The first person whom I saw, to my surprise, by the sober light of the shaded lamp, was Uriah.
  • Our treasure was warranted sober and honest.
  • You come to give me the benefit of your sober judgement at a most opportune time.
  • She had taken them out now, to adapt herself, I suppose, to the altered character of the house; and wore but one or two disconsolate bows of sober brown.

  • There are no more uses of "sober" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: Talk to me when your sober. Define
not under the influence of alcohol
as in: a sobering thought Define
serious; or making one serious or calm
as in: I need to sober up. Define
to become less drunk
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