To better see all uses of the word
acute
in
David Copperfield
please enable javascript.

Go to New Version of This Page
This old version has not been updated since 2016,
but we're leaving it in case you prefer it.
Show What's New
Please update your links from the new version.
acute
Used In
David Copperfield
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary

unspecified meaning
  • For I began to be sensible of acute pains in my limbs from lying out in the fields, and was now so tired and low that I could hardly keep myself awake for five minutes together.
  • I have my doubts, too, founded on the acute experience acquired at this period of my life, whether a sound enjoyment of animal food can develop itself freely in any human subject who is always in torment from tight boots.

  • Show more
  • I took Mr. Dick with me, because, acutely sensitive to my aunt’s reverses, and sincerely believing that no galley-slave or convict worked as I did, he had begun to fret and worry himself out of spirits and appetite, as having nothing useful to do.

  • There are no more uses of "acute" in the book.


To see samples from other sources, click a word sense below:
as in: acute pain Define
sharp (a severely negative event) -- often with a rapid onset
as in: acute vision Define
sharp (highly perceptive in some area or mentally sharp) (often with a connotation that resulting awareness is painful)
as in: an acute angle Define
sharp; or an angle measuring between 0 and 90 degrees
Show Multiple Meanings
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading