To better see all uses of the word
beckon
in
Nicholas Nickleby
please enable javascript.

beckon
Used In
Nicholas Nickleby
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • ’This is the first class in English spelling and philosophy, Nickleby,’ said Squeers, beckoning Nicholas to stand beside him.
  • ’Well,’ said Miss Price, beckoning him aside, and speaking with some degree of contempt—’you ARE a one to keep company.’
  • The boy beckoned Nicholas, and tumbling lazily downstairs before him, opened the door, and ushered him into the street.
  • Kate beckoned her not to retire, and Miss La Creevy took a seat in silence.
  • At length, his eyes wandered to a little dirty window on the left, through which the face of the clerk was dimly visible; that worthy chancing to look up, he beckoned him to attend.
  • ’Stay,’ said the old man, beckoning him into a bye street, where they could converse with less interruption.
  • After a short delay, he reappeared, and limping back again, halted midway, and beckoned Nicholas to follow him.
  • The stranger answered not; but, first looking back, as though to beckon to some unseen person outside, came, very deliberately, into the room, and was closely followed by a little man in brown, very much the worse for wear, who brought with him a mingled fumigation of stale tobacco and fresh onions.
  • Newman, with a grim smile at this manoeuvre, beckoned the young lady to advance, and having placed a chair for her, retired; looking stealthily over his shoulder at Ralph as he limped slowly out.
  • ’Come here,’ said Ralph, beckoning to him.
  • ’Come down,’ said Ralph, beckoning him.
  • Sometimes, but very rarely, he nodded to some passing face, or beckoned to a waiter to obey a call from one of the tables.
  • The man saw that the recognition was mutual, and beckoning to Ralph to take his former place under the tree, and not to stand in the falling rain, of which, in his first surprise, he had been quite regardless, addressed him in a hoarse, faint tone.
  • The poor attendant, with her eyes swollen and red with weeping, stood by; and to her Nicholas appealed in such passionate terms that she opened a side-door, and, supporting her mistress into an adjoining room, beckoned Nicholas to follow them.
  • Newman gave a nod, put it in his hat, and was shuffling away, when Gride, whose doting delight knew no bounds, beckoned him back again, and said, in a shrill whisper, and with a grin which puckered up his whole face, and almost obscured his eyes: ’Will you—will you take a little drop of something—just a taste?’
  • Smike (who, if he had ever been an object of interest in his life, had been one that day) accompanied them, joining sometimes one group and sometimes the other, as brother Charles, laying his hand upon his shoulder, bade him walk with him, or Nicholas, looking smilingly round, beckoned him to come and talk with the old friend who understood him best, and who could win a smile into his careworn face when none else could.

  • There are no more uses of "beckon" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • I should be studying, but television beckons me.
  • The police officer beckoned me to come over.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading