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Nicholas Nickleby
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Nicholas Nickleby
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  • Wretch,’ rejoined Nicholas, fiercely, ’touch him at your peril!
  • ’A miserable wretch,’ exclaimed Mr Knag, striking his forehead.
  • In so doing, I inflicted such punishment upon a wretch as he will not readily forget, though far less than he deserved from me.
  • ’A miserable wretch.’
  • ’Oh you malicious little wretch!’ cried Mrs Kenwigs, impressively shaking her forefinger at the small unfortunate, who might be thirteen years old, and was looking on with a singed head and a frightened face.
  • Newman Noggs, bowing to the young lady more like a gentleman than the miserable wretch he seemed, placed his hand upon his breast, and, pausing for a moment, with the air of a man who struggles to speak but is uncertain what to say, quitted the room.
  • ’A bachelor is a miserable wretch, sir,’ said Mr Lillyvick.
  • Why, if I was to say to them, "I’m told your friend Sir Mulberry is a base wretch," they’d laugh at me.’
  • ’Be silent yourself, you wretch.
  • Shrink from the loathsome companionship of this wretch as you would from corruption and disease.
  • ’Keep off!’ cried the trembling wretch.
  • Wretch!’ cried Nicholas.
  • The wretch told me true.
  • Do you know that, within one day, she will be sacrificed, as sure as you stand there alive, to a hoary wretch—a devil born and bred, and grey in devils’ ways?’
  • Mrs Kenwigs remembered that Mr Kenwigs had often said that he was not quite satisfied of the propriety of Miss Petowker’s conduct, and wondered how it was that she could have been blinded by such a wretch.
  • …sounds to which even the tumult of a great city is as nothing, four, six, or eight strong men at a time, have been hurried violently and swiftly from the world, when the scene has been rendered frightful with excess of human life; when curious eyes have glared from casement and house-top, and wall and pillar; and when, in the mass of white and upturned faces, the dying wretch, in his all-comprehensive look of agony, has met not one—not one—that bore the impress of pity or compassion.
  • ’To think that that Sir Mulberry Hawk should be such an abandoned wretch as Miss La Creevy says he is, Nicholas, my dear; when I was congratulating myself every day on his being an admirer of our dear Kate’s, and thinking what a thing it would be for the family if he was to become connected with us, and use his interest to get you some profitable government place.
  • Last night, the sacrifice of a young, affectionate, and beautiful creature, to such a wretch, and in such a cause, had seemed a thing too monstrous to succeed; and the warmer he grew, the more confident he felt that some interposition must save her from his clutches.
  • The cowering wretch, who still shook in every limb, and whose few grey hairs trembled and quivered on his head with abject dismay, tottered to his feet as he met Ralph’s eye, and, shielding his face with both hands, protested, while he crept towards the door, that it was no fault of his.
  • With frantic exclamations such as these, and with many others in which fear, grief, and rage, were strangely blended, the panic-stricken wretch gradually subdued his first loud outcry, until it had softened down into a low despairing moan, chequered now and then by a howl, as, going over such papers as were left in the chest, he discovered some new loss.
  • …but for which they might have earned their honest bread and lived in peace; how many died in soul, and had no chance of life; how many who could scarcely go astray, be they vicious as they would, turned haughtily from the crushed and stricken wretch who could scarce do otherwise, and who would have been a greater wonder had he or she done well, than even they had they done ill; how much injustice, misery, and wrong, there was, and yet how the world rolled on, from year to year, alike…

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  • Pity the poor wretch.
  • If you pay the blackmail, you will remain at the mercy of the unscrupulous wretch.

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