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whitewash
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Nicholas Nickleby
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whitewash -- as in: investigative whitewash
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Nicholas Nickleby
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  • The ceiling was supported, like that of a barn, by cross-beams and rafters; and the walls were so stained and discoloured, that it was impossible to tell whether they had ever been touched with paint or whitewash.
  • ’To be sure,’ said Mrs Nickleby, crying bitterly, ’he is a brute, a monster; and the walls are very bare, and want painting too, and I have had this ceiling whitewashed at the expense of eighteen-pence, which is a very distressing thing, considering that it is so much gone into your uncle’s pocket.
  • Some London houses have a melancholy little plot of ground behind them, usually fenced in by four high whitewashed walls, and frowned upon by stacks of chimneys: in which there withers on, from year to year, a crippled tree, that makes a show of putting forth a few leaves late in autumn when other trees shed theirs, and, drooping in the effort, lingers on, all crackled and smoke-dried, till the following season, when it repeats the same process, and perhaps, if the weather be…

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  • One could whitewash all he pleased, and put up comic neon signs, but the aged timbers stood strong under their additional burden.
    Harper Lee  --  Go Set a Watchman
  • For ten bucks, you could graffiti your name on Tom Sawyer’s whitewashed fence, but there were few takers.
    Gillian Flynn  --  Gone Girl

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