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Nicholas Nickleby
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Nicholas Nickleby
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  • ’ "You don’t look much like one," returned the baron scornfully.
  • ’How old is this boy, for God’s sake?’ inquired Ralph, wheeling back his chair, and surveying his nephew from head to foot with intense scorn.
  • ’You are facetious, sir,’ said Nicholas, scornfully.
  • ’I scorn your words, Minx,’ said Miss Squeers.
  • ’Now, ma’am,’ said Ralph, who had looked on, at all this, with such scorn as few men can express in looks, ’this is my niece.’
  • On Nicholas stopping to salute them, Mr Lenville laughed a scornful laugh, and made some general remark touching the natural history of puppies.
  • Madame Mantalini only looked scornful in reply; and, turning to Ralph, begged him to excuse her intrusion.
  • Shall I ever forget the morning I looked scornfully at him when he offered to carry my parasol?
  • Smarting with the agony of the blow, and concentrating into that one moment all his feelings of rage, scorn, and indignation, Nicholas sprang upon him, wrested the weapon from his hand, and pinning him by the throat, beat the ruffian till he roared for mercy.
  • ’Object of my scorn and hatred!’ said Mr Lenville, ’I hold ye in contempt.’
  • There is but one step to take, and that is to cast him off with the scorn and indignation he deserves.
  • Ralph looked after him, but neither moved nor spoke for some time: when he broke what almost seemed the silence of stupefaction, by a scornful laugh.
  • The fact is, that he did find so much in the books he read, applicable to his own misfortunes, and did find himself in every respect so much like the heroes—because of course he is conscious of his own superiority, as we all are, and very naturally—that he took to scorning everything, and became a genius; and I am quite sure that he is, at this very present moment, writing another book.’
  • ’No,’ cried Mrs Kenwigs, ’I scorn it.’
  • The father was too much absorbed with his own exultation to mark the look of scorn which, for an instant, Nicholas could not have suppressed had he been upon the rack.
  • How or by what means—for I scorn to sully her cause by falsehood or deceit—I do not know; at present I do not know, but I am not alone or single-handed in this business.
  • ’In the mean time,’ interrupted Kate, with becoming pride and indignation, ’I am to be the scorn of my own sex, and the toy of the other; justly condemned by all women of right feeling, and despised by all honest and honourable men; sunken in my own esteem, and degraded in every eye that looks upon me.
  • The journeyman, to whom this question was put, looked doubtfully at the young proprietor, and the young proprietor looked scornfully at the coal-heaver: observing at the same time: ’You won’t get shaved here, my man.’
  • ’Uncle,’ said Mrs Kenwigs, ’to think that you should have turned your back upon me and my dear children, and upon Kenwigs which is the author of their being—you who was once so kind and affectionate, and who, if anybody had told us such a thing of, we should have withered with scorn like lightning—you that little Lillyvick, our first and earliest boy, was named after at the very altar!
  • Here was Nicholas Nickleby, who would have scorned the thought of counting how the chances stood of his rising in favour or fortune with the brothers Cheeryble, now that their nephew had returned, already deep in calculations whether that same nephew was likely to rival him in the affections of the fair unknown—discussing the matter with himself too, as gravely as if, with that one exception, it were all settled; and recurring to the subject again and again, and feeling quite indignantů

  • There are no more uses of "scorn" in the book.

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  • Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.
  • That coach scorns students who don’t have natural ability.

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