To better see all uses of the word
Nicholas Nickleby
please enable javascript.

Used In
Nicholas Nickleby
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • ’Dear Nicholas,’ whispered Kate, touching her brother’s arm, ’who is that vulgar man?’
  • ’Well, I couldn’t help saying, miss, if you was to kill me for it,’ said the attendant, ’that I never see nobody look so vulgar as Miss Price this night.’
  • The last man, whoever he is—and he may be a cobbler or some low vulgar dog for aught we know—will have a longer pedigree than the greatest nobleman now alive; and I contend that this is not fair.
  • ’Drinking port-wine with the clown,’ said the manager; ’but he was greedy, and one night bit off the bowl of the glass, and choked himself, so his vulgarity was the death of him at last.’
  • The poor girl, who was so overwhelmed with confusion that she scarcely knew what she did, had determined to remain perfectly quiet; but fearing that by so doing she might seem to countenance Sir Mulberry’s boast, which had been uttered with great coarseness and vulgarity of manner, raised her eyes, and looked him in the face.
  • A thief in fustian is a vulgar character, scarcely to be thought of by persons of refinement; but dress him in green velvet, with a high-crowned hat, and change the scene of his operations, from a thickly-peopled city, to a mountain road, and you shall find in him the very soul of poetry and adventure.
  • CHAPTER 14 Having the Misfortune to treat of none but Common People, is necessarily of a Mean and Vulgar Character In that quarter of London in which Golden Square is situated, there is a bygone, faded, tumble-down street, with two irregular rows of tall meagre houses, which seem to have stared each other out of countenance years ago.
  • But with Mrs Wititterly the two titles were all sufficient; coarseness became humour, vulgarity softened itself down into the most charming eccentricity; insolence took the guise of an easy absence of reserve, attainable only by those who had had the good fortune to mix with high folks.
  • It was four in the afternoon—that is, the vulgar afternoon of the sun and the clock—and Mrs Wititterly reclined, according to custom, on the drawing-room sofa, while Kate read aloud a new novel in three volumes, entitled ’The Lady Flabella,’ which Alphonse the doubtful had procured from the library that very morning.
  • It was not exactly a hairdresser’s; that is to say, people of a coarse and vulgar turn of mind might have called it a barber’s; for they not only cut and curled ladies elegantly, and children carefully, but shaved gentlemen easily.
  • ) ’This is the hend, is it, of all my bearing with her deceitfulness, her lowness, her falseness, her laying herself out to catch the admiration of vulgar minds, in a way which made me blush for my—for my—’

  • There are no more uses of "vulgarity" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • Her vulgarity was a turnoff.
  • As if I’d ever given her grounds to believe I’d stoop to such vulgarity!
    Anton Chekhov  --  The Cherry Orchard

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading