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supposition
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Nicholas Nickleby
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supposition
Used In
Nicholas Nickleby
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  • ’I fear there is something more,’ stammered Nicholas with a half-smile, and looking towards Miss Squeers, ’it is a most awkward thing to say—but—the very mention of such a supposition makes one look like a puppy—still—may I ask if that lady supposes that I entertain any—in short, does she think that I am in love with her?’
  • Mrs Kenwigs was so overpowered by this supposition, that it needed all the tender attentions of Miss Petowker, of the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, to restore her to anything like a state of calmness; not to mention the assiduity of Mr Kenwigs, who held a fat smelling-bottle to his lady’s nose, until it became matter of some doubt whether the tears which coursed down her face were the result of feelings or SAL VOLATILE.

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  • It is a foolish supposition.
  • She paints a vivid picture, but we must remember it is all mere supposition.

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