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Nicholas Nickleby
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Nicholas Nickleby
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  • ’Put your handkerchief in your pocket, you little scoundrel, or I’ll murder you when the gentleman goes.’
  • ’Send that obstinate scoundrel down; don’t you hear me calling?’
  • The black-hearted scoundrel!’
  • ’Bolder,’ said Squeers, tucking up his wristbands, and moistening the palm of his right hand to get a good grip of the cane, ’you’re an incorrigible young scoundrel, and as the last thrashing did you no good, we must see what another will do towards beating it out of you.’
  • ’How could you presume to come here on such an errand, you scoundrel?’
  • Cunning scoundrel! he don’t think that.
  • ’You are a base and spiritless scoundrel!’ said Nicholas, ’and shall be proclaimed so to the world.
  • ’Have you quite recovered that scoundrel’s attack?’ asked Ralph.
  • ’Charity, to be sure,’ returned Squeers, rubbing his knees, ’and when he begins to be useful in a certain sort of way, this young scoundrel of a Nickleby comes and carries him off.
  • ’An unnatural scoundrel!’ said Nicholas, indignantly.
  • Liar, scoundrel, dastard, thief!’
  • Liar and scoundrel you are, in every action of your life; theft is your trade; and double dastard you must be, or you were not here today.
  • I know you of old for a ready scoundrel, but you never had a stout heart; and hard work, with (maybe) chains upon those legs of yours, and shorter food than when I "pinched" and "ground" you, has blunted your wits, or you would not come with such a tale as this to me.
  • This turmoil, instead of quickly subsiding after the first outburst, (as turmoils not unfrequently do, whether in taverns, legislative assemblies, or elsewhere,) into a mere grumbling and growling squabble, increased every moment; and although the whole din appeared to be raised by but one pair of lungs, yet that one pair was of so powerful a quality, and repeated such words as ’scoundrel,’
  • With such courtesies as these, and many low bows, and the same cold sneer upon his face all the while, Ralph busied himself in showing his visitors downstairs, and otherwise than by the slightest possible motion about the corners of his mouth, returned no show of answer to the look of admiration with which Sir Mulberry Hawk seemed to compliment him on being such an accomplished and most consummate scoundrel.
  • Some of the craftiest scoundrels that ever walked this earth, or rather—for walking implies, at least, an erect position and the bearing of a man—that ever crawled and crept through life by its dirtiest and narrowest ways, will gravely jot down in diaries the events of every day, and keep a regular debtor and creditor account with Heaven, which shall always show a floating balance in their own favour.

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  • He’s a scoundrel. Don’t trust him.
  • He is the most intolerable scoundrel on the face of the earth.
    Charles Dickens  --  Bleak House

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