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presumption
used in
Nicholas Nickleby
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presumption
Used in
Nicholas Nickleby
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  • A miniature, I presume.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • They include, I presume, correspondence?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • 'And they'll be bridesmaids, I presume?' said Nicholas.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • How could you presume to come here on such an errand, you scoundrel?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Oh!' said the gentleman, glancing at the card, 'you are the Mr Squeers mentioned here, I presume?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • How dare you presume to speak to me, sir—to address me—to come into my presence?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I know that to anyone but myself—to you, who consider the immeasurable distance between me and this young lady, who is now your ward, and the object of your peculiar care—my loving her, even in thought, must appear the height of rashness and presumption.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I am not a youth, ma'am, as you see; and although beings like you can never grow old, I venture to presume that we are fitted for each other.'  (not reviewed by editor)

  • 'Forgive me,' said Nicholas, with respectful earnestness, 'if I seem to say too much, or to presume upon the confidence which has been intrusted to me.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He waited to hear more with a countenance of some indignation, for the tone of speech had been anything but respectful, and the appearance of the individual whom he presumed to have been the speaker was coarse and swaggering.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • If there be any one grace or loveliness inseparable from that particular period of life, Miss Squeers may be presumed to have been possessed of it, as there is no reason to suppose that she was a solitary exception to an universal rule.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • A pretty language, certainly,' replied Nicholas; 'and as it has a name for everything, and admits of elegant conversation about everything, I presume it is a sensible one.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • 'Thanking you for your advice which was not required, Mr Browdie,' returned Miss Squeers, with laborious politeness, 'have the goodness not to presume to meddle with my Christian name.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Indeed he argued, and with great show of reason, that it ought to be rather more for one day than for five, inasmuch as the borrower might in the former case be very fairly presumed to be in great extremity, otherwise he would not borrow at all with such odds against him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • So long as he had been a passive instrument in his hands, Sir Mulberry had regarded him with no other feeling than contempt; but, now that he presumed to avow opinions in opposition to his, and even to turn upon him with a lofty tone and an air of superiority, he began to hate him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • You will scarcely remain in my house, I presume, sir, against my will,' said Ralph; 'or you can scarcely hope to make an impression upon a man who closes his ears to all that you can say, and is firmly and resolutely determined not to hear you.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • There were not many subjects of dispute which at that moment could have come home to his own breast more powerfully, for having the unknown uppermost in his thoughts, it naturally occurred to him that he would have done just the same if any audacious gossiper durst have presumed in his hearing to speak lightly of her.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • As Mrs Squeers had previously protested, however, that she was quite certain she had not got it, Smike received another box on the ear for presuming to contradict his mistress, together with a promise of a sound thrashing if he were not more respectful in future; so that he took nothing very advantageous by his motion.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • 'I have inquired at the door, Sir Mulberry, every day,' said Ralph, 'twice a day, indeed, at first—and tonight, presuming upon old acquaintance, and past transactions by which we have mutually benefited in some degree, I could not resist soliciting admission to your chamber.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • …majestically as he could, upstairs: not a little nettled, however, to observe that Miss Squeers and Master Squeers, and the servant girl, were enjoying the scene from a snug corner; the two former indulging in many edifying remarks about the presumption of poor upstarts, which occasioned a vast deal of laughter, in which even the most miserable of all miserable servant girls joined: while Nicholas, stung to the quick, drew over his head such bedclothes as he had, and sternly resolved…  (not reviewed by editor)

  • To add to his defeat, Sir Mulberry, considering any such efforts an invasion of his peculiar privilege, eyed the offender steadily, through his glass, as if astonished at his presumption, and audibly stated his impression that it was an 'infernal liberty,' which being a hint to Lord Frederick, he put up HIS glass, and surveyed the object of censure as if he were some extraordinary wild animal then exhibiting for the first time.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: presumption of innocence
as in: he is presumptious
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