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Nicholas Nickleby
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inquire
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Nicholas Nickleby
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  • I can easily inquire.
  • ’Public meeting?’ inquired Noggs.
  • ’What! and nobody called respecting it?’ inquired Mr Nickleby, pausing.
  • ’Dear me,’ said the merry-faced gentleman, looking merrier still, ’I merely intended to inquire—’
  • ’What HAS come, then?’ inquired Mr Nickleby.
  • Pray don’t trouble yourself to inquire,’ said Miss Squeers, producing that change of countenance which children call making a face.
  • ’Children alive?’ inquired Noggs, stepping up to him.
  • ’How old is this boy, for God’s sake?’ inquired Ralph, wheeling back his chair, and surveying his nephew from head to foot with intense scorn.
  • ’Are you willing to work, sir?’ he inquired, frowning on his nephew.
  • ’What’s that?’ inquired Noggs, pointing to the parcel.
  • ’Does it take long to get a nose, now?’ inquired Nicholas, smiling.
  • ’To the wery top, sir?’ inquired the waiter.
  • ’What’s this?’ inquired Nicholas.
  • ’Are they all brothers, sir?’ inquired the lady who had carried the ’Davy’ or safety-lamp.
  • ’ "Anything else, my lord?" inquired the domestic.
  • ’Are you cold, Nickleby?’ inquired Squeers, after they had travelled some distance in silence.
  • ’What do you say, Mr Knuckleboy?’ inquired Mrs Squeers.
  • ’Whom do you speak of?’ inquired Nicholas, wishing to rouse the poor half-witted creature to reason.
  • ’Think of who?’ inquired Mrs Squeers; who (as she often remarked) was no grammarian, thank Heaven.
  • ’Shall it be a hard or a soft nib?’ inquired Nicholas, smiling to prevent himself from laughing outright.
  • ’Did he look in this way?’ inquired the miller’s daughter, counterfeiting, as nearly as she could, a favourite leer of the corn-factor.
  • ’My dear girl, what have I got to do with her dressing beautifully or looking well?’ inquired Nicholas.
  • ’What do you say, Mr Nickleby?’ inquired Miss Price.
  • ’Number of what, child?’ inquired Miss La Creevy, looking up from her work.
  • ’I suppose he has money, hasn’t he?’ inquired Miss La Creevy.
  • ’Have you nothing to say to your uncle, my love?’ inquired Mrs Nickleby.
  • ’Is it far from here, sir?’ inquired Kate.
  • Mr Nickleby came back, and looked as confused as might be, as he inquired whether the ladies had any commands for him.
  • Without waiting for a reply, he inquired of the boys whether any one among them knew anything of their missing schoolmate.
  • ’Why must he?’ inquired Squeers.
  • ’Kenwigs is afraid,’ said Mrs K. ’What of?’ inquired Miss Petowker, ’not of her failing?’
  • ’They are living in the city still?’ inquired Nicholas.
  • ’I hope you don’t see anything against him, uncle?’ inquired Mrs Kenwigs.
  • ’What word?’ inquired Mr Lillyvick.
  • ’What’s that?’ inquired Mr Gregsbury.
  • ’Do you decline to undertake them, sir?’ inquired Mr Gregsbury, with his hand on the bell-rope.
  • ’Have you seen Mr Mantalini?’ inquired Miss Knag.
  • ’And drives very beautiful horses, doesn’t he?’ inquired another.
  • ’And youth?’ inquired Madame.
  • ’What is the matter with that gentleman, pray?’ inquired Mrs Nickleby, greatly disturbed by the sound.
  • ’Is he ill?’ inquired Kate, really alarmed.
  • ’What do you say, Nickleby?’ inquired the young man; ’am I to be a good customer?’
  • Is this the missis?’ inquired Scaley.
  • ’May I beg your pardon again, if I inquire what you mean, sir?’ said Nicholas.
  • ’Eh?’ replied the man, holding the door in his hand, and honouring the inquirer with a stare and a broad grin, ’Lord, no.’ ’I came by her own appointment,’ said Kate; ’I am—I am—to be employed here.’
  • ’You needn’t trouble yourself to inquire, my buck,’ said Sir Mulberry; ’Miss Nickleby and I understand each other; she declares on my side, and shows her taste.
  • They were lost on Squeers, however, whose gaze was fastened on the luckless Smike, as he inquired, according to custom in such cases, whether he had anything to say for himself.
  • ’Ale, Squeery?’ inquired the lady, winking and frowning to give him to understand that the question propounded, was, whether Nicholas should have ale, and not whether he (Squeers) would take any.
  • She therefore waited, very patiently, until all reminiscences and anecdotes, bearing or not bearing upon the subject, had been exhausted, and at last ventured to inquire what discovery had been made.
  • Kate looked up inquiringly.
  • Having entered Mr Snawley’s address, the schoolmaster had next to perform the still more agreeable office of entering the receipt of the first quarter’s payment in advance, which he had scarcely completed, when another voice was heard inquiring for Mr Squeers.
  • ’Lor, what nonsense he talks!’ exclaimed Mrs Lillyvick in answer to the inquiring look of Nicholas.
  • As there was a stream of people pouring into a shabby house not far from the entrance, he waited until they had made their way in, and then making up to the servant, ventured to inquire if he knew where Mr Gregsbury lived.
  • When his mirth had subsided, he inquired what Nicholas meant to do; on his informing him, to go straight to London, he shook his head doubtfully, and inquired if he knew how much the coaches charged to carry passengers so far.
  • When his mirth had subsided, he inquired what Nicholas meant to do; on his informing him, to go straight to London, he shook his head doubtfully, and inquired if he knew how much the coaches charged to carry passengers so far.
  • Having adopted in its place a dirty cotton nightcap, and groped about in the dark till he found a remnant of candle, he knocked at the partition which divided the two garrets, and inquired, in a loud voice, whether Mr Noggs had a light.
  • With such inquires, and many more such, Mr Lillyvick jerked his elbow into Nicholas’s side, and chuckled till his face became quite purple in the attempt to keep down his satisfaction.
  • Uttering a low querulous growl, the speaker, whose harsh countenance was the very epitome of selfishness, raked the scanty fire nearly out of the grate, and, emptying the glass which Noggs had pushed towards him, inquired where he kept his coals.
  • ’Is it a good road?’ inquired Nicholas.
  • ’What did you think of that, sir?’ inquired Mr Crummles.
  • ’What should I get for all this?’ inquired Nicholas, after a few moments’ reflection.
  • ’Your daughter?’ inquired Nicholas.
  • ’May I ask how old she is?’ inquired Nicholas.
  • ’Do you give lessons, ma’am?’ inquired Nicholas.
  • ’Is there anything good for me?’ inquired Mr Folair, anxiously.
  • At length, the lady, turning to Miss Snevellicci, inquired what play she proposed to have.
  • It being finished, she inquired what Mr Curdle thought, about putting down their names.
  • ’What should you say to a young lady from London?’ inquired Mr Crummles.
  • ’Is it—?’ inquired Mr Crummles, hesitating.
  • ’How do you feel now, my love?’ inquired Miss Snevellicci.
  • ’It’s very soon done, sir, isn’t it?’ inquired Mr Folair of the collector, leaning over the table to address him.
  • ’What?’ inquired Nicholas.
  • ’But where’s my brother-in-law, Sir Mulberry?’ inquired Mrs Nickleby.
  • ’Is she like you?’ inquired Smike.
  • ’From whom and what about?’ inquired Nicholas.
  • ’Then I am to make three last appearances, am I?’ inquired Nicholas, smiling.
  • ’Do you know what time he will be home?’ inquired Nicholas, tapping at the door of Newman’s front neighbour.
  • ’Do you know that person’s name?’ he inquired of the man in an audible voice; pointing out Sir Mulberry as he put the question.
  • ’To do that, my joy?’ inquired Mr Mantalini, who did not seem to have caught the words.
  • Ralph affected to smile, and once more inquired from whom Mr Mantalini had derived his information.
  • ’Were you obliged to have medical attendance?’ inquired Ralph.
  • With which remarks, Mrs Nickleby turned to her daughter, and inquired, in an audible whisper, whether the gentleman was going to stop all night.
  • ’Did he say whether he had any business to speak about?’ inquired Sir Mulberry, after a little impatient consideration.
  • ’Couldn’t you say that without wrenching a man’s limbs off his body?’ inquired the coachman.
  • ’Where has he been all this time?’ inquired Snawley.
  • ’Hoo wor it?’ inquired John, sitting down close to him.
  • Nicholas needed no second invitation, and eagerly inquired what was the news.
  • Suddenly the sound of cautious footsteps attracted his ear, and directly afterwards a female voice inquired if the gentleman was there.
  • ’Then are you any relation to the Archbishop of Canterbury?’ inquired the old gentleman with great anxiety, ’or to the Pope of Rome?
  • ’Were they at all disposed to give you credit for assisting in the escape?’ inquired Nicholas of John Browdie.
  • ’Couldn’t you wish to be married to him yourself, if that was the case?’ inquired Mrs Browdie, with great suavity of manner.
  • The unpopular gentleman looked coolly round, and addressing himself to Nicholas, said: ’You inquired just now what was the matter here.
  • ’We promised Sir Mulberry and Lord Frederick,’ said Pyke, ’that we’d call this morning and inquire whether you took any cold last night.’
  • Kate ventured to inquire.
  • ’Ye’d betther inquire, mun,’ said John Browdie.
  • ’Do you know the town at all?’ inquired the manager, who seemed to consider himself entitled to the same degree of confidence as he had himself exhibited.
  • ’What does Mr Johnson say, Vincent?’ inquired a voice close to his ear; and, looking round, he found Mrs Crummles and Miss Snevellicci herself standing behind him.
  • Mr Nickleby looked very indignant at the handmaid on being thus corrected, and demanded with much asperity what she meant; which she was about to state, when a female voice proceeding from a perpendicular staircase at the end of the passage, inquired who was wanted.
  • Occupied in these reflections, as he was making his way along one of the great public thoroughfares of London, he chanced to raise his eyes to a blue board, whereon was inscribed, in characters of gold, ’General Agency Office; for places and situations of all kinds inquire within.’
  • By this time the good lady had been a long while upon one topic, so she fell at once into her daughter’s little trap, if trap it were, and inquired what she had been going to say.
  • Improving the occasion in these words, Mr Squeers patted his son’s head again, and then patted Smike’s—but harder; and inquired in a bantering tone how he found himself by this time.
  • After a short silence, during which most of the young people made a closer inspection of Kate’s appearance, and compared notes respecting it, one of them offered to help her off with her shawl, and the offer being accepted, inquired whether she did not find black very uncomfortable wear.
  • This was such a very singular proceeding on the part of an utter stranger, and his appearance was so extremely peculiar, that Nicholas, who had a sufficiently keen sense of the ridiculous, could not refrain from breaking into a smile as he inquired whether Mr Noggs had any commands for him.
  • Even the box-passenger caught the infection, and growing wonderfully deferential, immediately inquired whether there was not very good society in that neighbourhood, to which the lady replied yes, there was: in a manner which sufficiently implied that she moved at the very tiptop and summit of it all.
  • ’But this man, who is not a shoemaker—what has he done, mother, what has he said?’ inquired Nicholas, fretted almost beyond endurance, but looking nearly as resigned and patient as Mrs Nickleby herself.
  • Miss Snevellicci’s modest double-knock was answered by a foot-boy, who, in reply to her inquiry whether Mrs Curdle was at home, opened his eyes very wide, grinned very much, and said he didn’t know, but he’d inquire.
  • Ralph never laughed, but on this occasion he produced the nearest approach to it that he could, and waiting until Mr Squeers had enjoyed the professional joke to his heart’s content, inquired what had brought him to town.
  • ’A beautiful bird!’ said Arthur, after inquiring the price, and finding it proportionate to the size.
  • What does the giant say to the pigmy?’ inquired Arthur Gride, hobbling up to Ralph.
  • ’D’ye think it’s done?’ inquired old Arthur, peering into his companion’s face with half-closed eyes.
  • ’Then why do you give way to these fits of melancholy?’ inquired Nicholas, in his kindest manner; ’or why not tell us the cause?
  • ’And wha-at’s to be done tomorrow?’ inquired Lord Frederick.
  • ’And what say you to that?’ inquired Ralph, looking keenly at his drudge.
  • ’Kenwigses have got a boy, haven’t they?’ inquired the collector.
  • ’What seems a cruel thing?’ inquired Ralph, with as much stolidity of face, as if he really were in utter ignorance of the other’s meaning.
  • ’What of Kate?’ inquired Nicholas.
  • ’Is that you?’ inquired Peg.
  • Mrs Sliderskew complied, and inquired what the next one was.
  • ’What’s the next?’ inquired Peg.
  • His wife presented herself; and, of her, Ralph inquired whether her husband was at home.
  • How often have I inquired for you, and been told that I should hear before long!’
  • ’Not the least in the world last night, sir,’ replied Mrs Nickleby, ’with many thanks to his lordship and Sir Mulberry for doing me the honour to inquire; not the least—which is the more singular, as I really am very subject to colds, indeed—very subject.
  • After waiting for another half-hour, he dispatched the woman who kept his house to Newman’s lodging, to inquire if he were ill, and why he had not come or sent.
  • It was opened by a strange servant, on whom the odd figure of the visitor did not appear to make the most favourable impression possible, inasmuch as she no sooner saw him than she very nearly closed it, and placing herself in the narrow gap, inquired what he wanted.
  • ’I have inquired at the door, Sir Mulberry, every day,’ said Ralph, ’twice a day, indeed, at first—and tonight, presuming upon old acquaintance, and past transactions by which we have mutually benefited in some degree, I could not resist soliciting admission to your chamber.
  • At other times, when Nicholas came home at night, he would be accompanied by Mr Frank Cheeryble, who was commissioned by the brothers to inquire how Madeline was that evening.
  • He did not appear to take the smallest notice of what Mrs Nickleby said, but when she ceased to speak he honoured her with a long stare, and inquired if she had quite finished.
  • He slept at the inn at Greta Bridge on the night of his arrival, and, rising at a very early hour next morning, walked to the market town, and inquired for John Browdie’s house.
  • As there appeared to be some doubt in the mind of his patron how he could best join in this conversation, the indefatigable Mr Pyke threw himself into the breach, and, by way of saying something to the point, inquired—with reference to the aforesaid medicine—whether it was nice.
  • Now, a proud usher in a Yorkshire school was such a very extraordinary and unaccountable thing to hear of,—any usher at all being a novelty; but a proud one, a being of whose existence the wildest imagination could never have dreamed—that Miss Squeers, who seldom troubled herself with scholastic matters, inquired with much curiosity who this Knuckleboy was, that gave himself such airs.
  • Mr Mantalini had got by this time into the passage, and was making his way to the door of Ralph’s office with very little ceremony, when Newman interposed his body; and hinting that Mr Nickleby was unwilling to be disturbed, inquired whether the client’s business was of a pressing nature.
  • They terminated in his dispatching a letter by Newman, addressed to Mr Squeers at the Saracen’s Head, with instructions to inquire whether he had arrived in town, and, if so, to wait an answer.
  • At length he felt it was hopeless to remain, and going downstairs again, inquired of one of the lodgers if he knew anything of Mr Squeers’s movements—mentioning that worthy by an assumed name which had been agreed upon between them.
  • There was no time to inquire to what this exclamation, which was delivered in a very rapturous tone, referred; for he had already thrown open the door of the room; into which Nicholas, followed by Smike with the bundle on his shoulder (he carried it about with him as vigilantly as if it had been a sack of gold), straightway repaired.
  • Inquiring for the object of his solicitude, he learnt that he had timed his visit well; for Mr Squeers was, in fact, at that moment waiting for a hackney coach he had ordered, and in which he purposed proceeding to his week’s retirement, like a gentleman.
  • Nicholas shook hands, kissed his old pupils all round, intrusted a large parcel of toys to the guardianship of Morleena, bowed to the doctor and the married ladies, and inquired after Mrs Kenwigs in a tone of interest, which went to the very heart and soul of the nurse, who had come in to warm some mysterious compound, in a little saucepan over the fire.
  • Thence, he went straight to the inn which Mr Squeers frequented, and inquired when he had been there last; in the vague hope that, successful or unsuccessful, he might, by this time, have returned from his mission and be able to assure him that all was safe.
  • The young lady interrupted the conversation at this point, by thrusting her head out of the bar-window, and inquiring of the waiter in a shrill voice whether that young man who had been knocked down was going to stand in the passage all night, or whether the entrance was to be left clear for other people.
  • With his chin sunk upon his breast, and his downcast eyes quite hidden by the contraction of his knotted brows, he might have been asleep for any sign of consciousness he gave until the coach stopped, when he raised his head, and glancing through the window, inquired what place that was.
  • Disturbed by a thousand fears and surmises, and bent upon ascertaining whether Squeers had any suspicion of Snawley, or was, in any way, a party to this altered behaviour, Ralph determined to hazard the extreme step of inquiring for him at the Lambeth lodging, and having an interview with him even there.
  • When John Browdie came to be spoken of, he dropped, by slow and gradual degrees, into a chair, and rubbing, his hands upon his knees—quicker and quicker as the story reached its climax—burst, at last, into a laugh composed of one loud sonorous ’Ha! ha!’ having given vent to which, his countenance immediately fell again as he inquired, with the utmost anxiety, whether it was probable that John Browdie and Squeers had come to blows.
  • This call, loudly repeated twice or thrice at the room-door, brought into the apartment a short, thin, weasen, blear-eyed old woman, palsy-stricken and hideously ugly, who, wiping her shrivelled face upon her dirty apron, inquired, in that subdued tone in which deaf people commonly speak: ’Was that you a calling, or only the clock a striking?
  • Without stopping to inquire whether the intervening day appeared to Nicholas to consist of the usual number of hours of the ordinary length, it may be remarked that, to the parties more directly interested in the forthcoming ceremony, it passed with great rapidity, insomuch that when Miss Petowker awoke on the succeeding morning in the chamber of Miss Snevellicci, she declared that nothing should ever persuade her that that really was the day which was to behold a change in her…
  • …that Tim’s accounts were more than usually intricate that morning, or whether it was that his habitual serenity had been a little disturbed by these recollections, it so happened that when Nicholas returned from executing some commission, and inquired whether Mr Charles Cheeryble was alone in his room, Tim promptly, and without the smallest hesitation, replied in the affirmative, although somebody had passed into the room not ten minutes before, and Tim took especial and particular…
  • Nicholas had ample time to make these observations while the little boy, who went on errands for the lodgers, clattered down the kitchen stairs and was heard to scream, as in some remote cellar, for Miss Bray’s servant, who, presently appearing and requesting him to follow her, caused him to evince greater symptoms of nervousness and disorder than so natural a consequence of his having inquired for that young lady would seem calculated to occasion.
  • …deemed it of particular importance that she should have her wits about her; for, from certain signs and tokens which had attracted her attention, she shrewdly suspected that Mr Frank, interested as his uncles were in Madeline, came quite as much to see Kate as to inquire after her; the more especially as the brothers were in constant communication with the medical man, came backwards and forwards very frequently themselves, and received a full report from Nicholas every morning.
  • ’The baron took another look at his new friend, whom he thought an uncommonly queer customer, and at length inquired whether he took any active part in such little proceedings as that which he had in contemplation.

  • There are no more uses of "inquire" in the book.


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