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epithet
used in
Nicholas Nickleby
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epithet
Used in
Nicholas Nickleby
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  • Here have I been, a matter of how many weeks—hard upon six—a follering up this here blessed old dowager petty larcenerer,'—Mr Squeers delivered himself of this epithet with great difficulty and effort,—'and Dotheboys Hall a-running itself regularly to seed the while!  (not reviewed by editor)

  • A nasty, ungrateful, pig-headed, brutish, obstinate, sneaking dog,' exclaimed Mrs Squeers, taking Smike's head under her arm, and administering a cuff at every epithet; 'what does he mean by that?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Mrs Squeers, when excited, was accustomed to use strong language, and, moreover, to make use of a plurality of epithets, some of which were of a figurative kind, as the word peacock, and furthermore the allusion to Nicholas's nose, which was not intended to be taken in its literal sense, but rather to bear a latitude of construction according to the fancy of the hearers.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • (Miss Squeers hesitated a long time for this last epithet, and brought it out triumphantly as last, as if it quite clinched the business.) 'This is the hend, is it, of all my bearing with her deceitfulness, her lowness, her falseness, her laying herself out to catch the admiration of vulgar minds, in a way which made me blush for my—for my—' 'Gender,' suggested Mr Squeers, regarding the spectators with a malevolent eye—literally A malevolent eye.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: racial epithet
as in: earned the epithet, "The Great"
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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