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vestige
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Nicholas Nickleby
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vestige
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Nicholas Nickleby
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  • He had visited the houses of the poor in the various districts of London, and had found them destitute of the slightest vestige of a muffin, which there appeared too much reason to believe some of these indigent persons did not taste from year’s end to year’s end.
  • While the girl was gone on this errand, Mrs Nickleby hastily swept into a cupboard all vestiges of eating and drinking; which she had scarcely done, and seated herself with looks as collected as she could assume, when two gentlemen, both perfect strangers, presented themselves.
  • Whatever the idle hopes he had suffered himself to entertain, whatever the pleasant visions which had sprung up in his mind and grouped themselves round the fair image of Madeline Bray, they were now dispelled, and not a vestige of their gaiety and brightness remained.

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  • She had not yet lost the last vestige of hope.
  • The garden, with its golden apples (oranges), is gone now—no vestige of it remains.
    Twain, Mark  --  The Innocents Abroad

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