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retort
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Nicholas Nickleby
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retort -- as in: quick retort
Used In
Nicholas Nickleby
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  • "Don’t tell me a lie," retorted the schoolmaster.
  • ’You’d have little enough to live upon, if you did,’ retorted the uncle, eyeing him contemptuously.
  • And as the lady’s humour was considered to lie chiefly in retort, Mr Squeers laughed heartily, and seemed to expect that Nicholas should do the same.
  • ’Oh! sneezed, did you?’ retorted Mr Squeers.
  • ’I’m sure I heard you say as much, my dear,’ retorted Ralph in his cold sarcastic manner.
  • ’Believe!’ retorted the other, ’can anybody doubt it?
  • ’Your missus is a fool,’ retorted Squeers.
  • ’No consequence, why how you talk!’ retorted Mrs Squeers sharply; ’isn’t it brimstone morning?’
  • ’What’s that to you?’ retorted Mrs Squeers.
  • ’Not a bit of it,’ retorted Mrs Squeers.
  • ’Oh no, I think nothing at all,’ retorted Miss Price, pettishly.
  • ’Thank you, ’Tilda, dear,’ retorted Miss Squeers, majestically.
  • ’And who cares whether you are sure or not, ma’am?’ retorted Miss Squeers, making another face.
  • ’I shall not come to you to take lessons in the art, ma’am!’ retorted Miss Squeers.
  • ’He is not,’ retorted Nicholas angrily, ’don’t tell me one.’
  • ’Damn you, what do you mean by that?’ retorted Squeers in great perturbation.
  • ’IF you catch him,’ retorted Mrs Squeers, contemptuously; ’you are sure to; you can’t help it, if you go the right way to work.
  • ’ ’ "Love," my dear,’ retorted Mr Lillyvick.
  • ’Don’t tell me you’re sorry,’ retorted Mr Lillyvick, with much sharpness.
  • What is it?’ retorted the member, looking shrewdly at him, with his head on one side.
  • ’By your leave, Mr Knag,’ retorted the charwoman, turning sharp round.
  • ’YOU offended me!’ retorted Miss Knag, ’YOU! a chit, a child, an upstart nobody!
  • ’You would sell your flesh and blood for money; yourself, if you have not already made a bargain with the devil,’ retorted the other.
  • ’I dare say you didn’t know, indeed!’ retorted Miss La Creevy.
  • ’Mighty well, sir,’ retorted Ralph; ’but perhaps it may concern others, who may think it worth their while to listen, and consider what I tell them.
  • ’By all means if you vish it,’ retorted Mr Scaley; ’and the ninepence.’
  • ’Well, then, my love, I wish you would keep your foolish fancy to yourself, and not wake up MY foolish fancy to keep it company,’ retorted Mrs Nickleby.
  • ’It shall be brought round in any way it likes best, and not brought round at all if it likes that better,’ retorted Mr Mantalini, with his egg-spoon in his mouth.
  • ’Think no more of that place, for it is all over,’ retorted Nicholas, fixing his eyes full upon that of his companion, which was fast settling into an unmeaning stupefied gaze, once habitual to him, and common even then.
  • ’Oh, I’m sure—it’s very flattering of you to say so,’ retorted Miss Snevellicci with a graceful bend.
  • ’Nothing, my dear sir,’ retorted the manager, with evident impatience.
  • ’That’s what I say,’ retorted the collector, patting him benignantly on the side of the head with his umbrella; ’just what I say.
  • ’The noose, sir?’ retorted Mr Lillyvick.
  • ’And that is the very reason, my dear Mrs Nickleby, why you should go out tonight,’ retorted Mr Pluck.
  • ’And why not?’ retorted Sir Mulberry.
  • ’Then he will come straight here,’ retorted Newman.
  • ’With me, sir?’ retorted Sir Mulberry Hawk, eyeing him in disdainful surprise.
  • ’Why, that leaves you fifty,’ retorted Ralph.
  • Speak out, man,’ retorted Ralph.
  • ’More shame for you,’ retorted the nurse.
  • ’They an’t draw’d into it by ME, ’Tilda,’ retorted Miss Squeers.
  • ’Then dean’t shut it at all,’ retorted John Browdie.
  • ’Never mind, my dear boy,’ retorted Noggs, clapping him on the shoulder.
  • ’I scarcely ever hear you, my dear,’ retorted Mrs Nickleby; ’that’s all I’ve got to say.’
  • ’Well, John!’ retorted her husband, impatiently.
  • ’I dinnot know whether thou’d ever dreamt of it, though I think that’s loike eneaf, mind,’ retorted John; ’but thou didst it.
  • ’Coom,’ retorted John, ’thot’s tidy in you, thot is.
  • ’Oh, ma’am, how witty you are,’ retorted Miss Squeers with a low curtsy, ’almost as witty, ma’am, as you are clever.
  • ’Ain’t you!’ retorted Squeers, with a diabolical look.
  • ’Then you are acquainted with as much talent as was ever compressed into one young person’s body,’ retorted Mr Crummles, rolling up the bills again; ’that is, talent of a certain sort—of a certain sort.
  • ’You were right,’ retorted Ralph; ’and as you feel no surprise, need express none.’
  • ’I am quite aware of that,’ retorted Madame Mantalini, tossing her head; ’and I have none.
  • ’Say what thou’st gotten to say then, sir,’ retorted John; ’and tak’ care thou dinnot put up angry bluid which thou’dst betther try to quiet.’
  • I have his father here,’ retorted Ralph.
  • ’Never you mind,’ retorted that gentleman, tapping his nose derisively.
  • ’YOU think so, do you?’ retorted the father, angrily.
  • ’Deep enough,’ retorted Ralph, ’to know that I shall need all the depth I have, when men like you begin to compliment.
  • ’Why, who the devil should there be?’ retorted Ralph, testily.
  • ’Why, of course it would,’ retorted Mr Bray, in an exasperated tone.
  • ’Dear me, Kate,’ retorted Mrs Nickleby, ’what an extraordinary girl you are!
  • ’This IS mine,’ retorted Lord Frederick.
  • ’Why not do?’ retorted Peg.
  • ’Go where?’ retorted Peg.
  • ’I say it does,’ retorted Bray, with a show of much irritation.
  • ’That I dare say you have,’ retorted her mother, briskly.
  • ’You don’t keep many cooks, and can easily apologise to them for the trouble,’ retorted Ralph.
  • ’He did it cheap!’ retorted Ralph, testily; ’yes, and he did it well, and carries it off with a hypocritical face and a sanctified air, but you!
  • ’How can it ever be otherwise?’ retorted Ralph.
  • ’I show no mercy,’ retorted Ralph with a triumphant smile, ’and I ask none.
  • ’Ah, I know when to hold my tongue, and when to speak, Mr Nickleby,’ retorted the dame.
  • ’Not so much his secrets as other people’s secrets, perhaps,’ retorted the woman; ’not so much his secrets as yours.
  • ’And so must you be in a few days,’ retorted Ralph, with affected good-humour.
  • ’Then why don’t you go and list for a soldier?’ retorted the woman; ’you’re welcome to.’
  • This did not serve him; for, at such bantering or retort as suited the company, he was no match for Sir Mulberry.
  • He soon overcame this feeling, however, if it had restrained him at all, and retorted angrily: ’If I remember what passed at the time you speak of, I expressed a strong opinion on this subject, and said that, with my knowledge or consent, you never should do what you threaten now.’
  • So far from walking up, the gentlemen on the stairs began to walk down with great alacrity, and to entreat, with extraordinary politeness, that the gentlemen nearest the street would go first; the gentlemen nearest the street retorted, with equal courtesy, that they couldn’t think of such a thing on any account; but they did it, without thinking of it, inasmuch as the other gentlemen pressing some half-dozen (among whom was Nicholas) forward, and closing up behind, pushed them, not…
  • The estimable gentleman last named cast a hasty look at the table, as if he were prompted by this retort to throw a jug or bottle at the head of Nicholas, but he was interrupted in this design (if such design he had) by Ralph, who, touching him on the elbow, bade him tell the father that he might now appear and claim his son.
  • …a constitutionally vicious temper—aggravated, just now, by travel and recent jolting—was somewhat irritated by old recollections and the failure of her own designs upon Mr Browdie; and the acrimonious retort might have led to a great many other retorts, which might have led to Heaven knows what, if the subject of conversation had not been, at that precise moment, accidentally changed by Mr Squeers himself ’What do you think?’ said that gentleman; ’who do you suppose we have laid hands…
  • The sarcastic tone of this reply might have provoked a rather acrimonious retort from Miss Squeers, who, besides being of a constitutionally vicious temper—aggravated, just now, by travel and recent jolting—was somewhat irritated by old recollections and the failure of her own designs upon Mr Browdie; and the acrimonious retort might have led to a great many other retorts, which might have led to Heaven knows what, if the subject of conversation had not been, at that precise moment,…
  • …from Miss Squeers, who, besides being of a constitutionally vicious temper—aggravated, just now, by travel and recent jolting—was somewhat irritated by old recollections and the failure of her own designs upon Mr Browdie; and the acrimonious retort might have led to a great many other retorts, which might have led to Heaven knows what, if the subject of conversation had not been, at that precise moment, accidentally changed by Mr Squeers himself ’What do you think?’ said that…
  • Cringing and cowardly to the core by nature, Arthur Gride humbled himself in the dust before Ralph Nickleby, and, even when they had not this stake in common, would have licked his shoes and crawled upon the ground before him rather than venture to return him word for word, or retort upon him in any other spirit than one of the most slavish and abject sycophancy.
  • ) ’Never let me hear of it again,’ retorted Miss Squeers.

  • There are no more uses of "retort" in the book.


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  • She wanted to retort that he that he sounded more foolish than he looked, but she made herself count to ten and thought better of it.
  • She retorted, "Takes one to know one."

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