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petulant
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Nicholas Nickleby
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petulant
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Nicholas Nickleby
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  • ’ "Pooh!" said the apparition, petulantly, "no better than a man’s killing himself because he has none or little."
  • ’Oh I dare say, Miss La Creevy,’ returned Mrs Nickleby, with a petulance not unnatural in her unhappy circumstances, ’it’s very easy to say cheer up, but if you had as many occasions to cheer up as I have had—and there,’ said Mrs Nickleby, stopping short.
  • ’You always believe,’ returned her father, petulantly.
  • That through the utmost depths of poverty and affliction she had toiled, never turning aside for an instant from her task, never wearied by the petulant gloom of a sick man sustained by no consoling recollections of the past or hopes of the future; never repining for the comforts she had rejected, or bewailing the hard lot she had voluntarily incurred.

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  • She stomped her foot like a petulant child.
  • She is petulant by nature and was clearly insulted by the question.

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