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Nicholas Nickleby
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Nicholas Nickleby
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  • ’Yes, ma’am,’ replied Kate, not daring to look up; for she felt that the eyes of the odious man in the dressing-gown were directed towards her.
  • ’If you will be odiously, demnebly, outrIgeously jealous, my soul,’ said Mr Mantalini, ’you will be very miserable—horrid miserable—demnition miserable.’
  • There was something so odious, so insolent, so repulsive in the look which met her, that, without the power to stammer forth a syllable, she rose and hurried from the room.
  • As the odious Sir Mulberry Hawk attached himself to Kate with less and less of disguise, Mrs Wititterly began to grow jealous of the superior attractions of Miss Nickleby.
  • Then followed the recognition of Lord Verisopht, and then the greeting of Mr Pyke, and then that of Mr Pluck, and finally, to complete the young lady’s mortification, she was compelled at Mrs Wititterly’s request to perform the ceremony of introducing the odious persons, whom she regarded with the utmost indignation and abhorrence.
  • Before that estimable lady could recover herself, or offer the slightest retaliation, she was forced into a kneeling posture by a crowd of shouting tormentors, and compelled to swallow a spoonful of the odious mixture, rendered more than usually savoury by the immersion in the bowl of Master Wackford’s head, whose ducking was intrusted to another rebel.

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  • Though they think the country’s government is odious, they’re unwilling to help topple it for fear of the consequences.
  • The sight of me is odious in their eyes;
    Shakespeare, William  --  King Henry VI, Part 2

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