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obstinate
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Nicholas Nickleby
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obstinate
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Nicholas Nickleby
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  • I say it’s obstinacy, and nothing shall ever convince me that it isn’t.
  • ’Send that obstinate scoundrel down; don’t you hear me calling?’
  • Don’t be cast down, sir; you will be teaching all the young noblemen in Dotheboys Hall in less than a week’s time, unless this gentleman is more obstinate than I take him to be.’
  • ’A nasty, ungrateful, pig-headed, brutish, obstinate, sneaking dog,’ exclaimed Mrs Squeers, taking Smike’s head under her arm, and administering a cuff at every epithet; ’what does he mean by that?’
  • ’Damn your obstinacy, Tim Linkinwater, what do you mean, sir?’
  • If an iron door could be supposed to quarrel with its hinges, and to make a firm resolution to open with slow obstinacy, and grind them to powder in the process, it would emit a pleasanter sound in so doing, than did these words in the rough and bitter voice in which they were uttered by Ralph.
  • ’Damn your obstinacy, Tim Linkinwater,’ said brother Charles, looking at him without the faintest spark of anger, and with a countenance radiant with attachment to the old clerk.
  • Sir Mulberry, however, who was not quite sober, and who was in a sullen and dogged state of obstinacy, soon silenced the representations of his weak young friend, and further seemed—as if to save himself from a repetition of them—to insist on being left alone.
  • It has the most extraordinary effect upon me, checks and controls me in the most furious and obstinate mood.
  • Pride, obstinacy, reputation for fine feeling, were all against it.
  • ’Don’t know about it, Mr Francis!’ interrupted Tim, with an obstinate air.
  • Perhaps, at, another time, Ralph’s obstinacy and dislike would have been proof against any appeal from such a quarter, however emphatically urged; but now, after a moment’s hesitation, he went into the hall for his hat, and returning, got into the coach without speaking a word.
  • We entreat you—brother Ned, you join me, I know, in this entreaty, and so, Tim Linkinwater, do you, although you pretend to be an obstinate dog, sir, and sit there frowning as if you didn’t—we entreat you to retire from London, to take shelter in some place where you will be safe from the consequences of these wicked designs, and where you may have time, sir, to atone for them, and to become a better man.’
  • Whoosh!’ with which last sound, uttered in a hissing manner between his teeth, the old gentleman swung his arms violently round and round, and at the same time alternately advanced on Mrs Nickleby, and retreated from her, in that species of savage dance with which boys on market-days may be seen to frighten pigs, sheep, and other animals, when they give out obstinate indications of turning down a wrong street.

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  • She is an obstinate child who will not follow the family rules.
  • He is obstinate as a mule.

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