To better see all uses of the word
malicious
in
Nicholas Nickleby
please enable javascript.

malicious
Used In
Nicholas Nickleby
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • ’I pity your bad passions, ’Tilda,’ replied Miss Squeers, ’but I bear no malice.
  • ’Well, Nickleby,’ said Squeers, eyeing him maliciously.
  • ’You see that I am prepared to hear the very worst that malice can have suggested.
  • ’Come back, Mr Nickleby, do!’ cried Miss Price, affecting alarm at her friend’s threat, but really actuated by a malicious wish to hear what Nicholas would say; ’come back, Mr Nickleby!’
  • ’Oh you malicious little wretch!’ cried Mrs Kenwigs, impressively shaking her forefinger at the small unfortunate, who might be thirteen years old, and was looking on with a singed head and a frightened face.
  • ’In the main,’ said Nicholas, ’there may be no great difference of opinion between you and me, so far; but you will understand, that I desire to confront him, to justify myself, and to cast his duplicity and malice in his throat.’
  • ’You surely don’t mind what that malicious creature says, Mr Johnson?’ observed Miss Snevellicci in her most winning tones.
  • You have said much worse of me, scores of times, Fanny; but I have never borne any malice to you, and I hope you’ll not bear any to me.’
  • Squeers scowled at him with the worst and most malicious expression of which his face was capable—it was a face of remarkable capability, too, in that way—and shook his fist stealthily.
  • It was scarcely necessary to do this, but Miss Squeers was as good as her word; and poor Nicholas, in addition to bad food, dirty lodging, and the being compelled to witness one dull unvarying round of squalid misery, was treated with every special indignity that malice could suggest, or the most grasping cupidity put upon him.
  • I tell you plainly, gentlemen, that little as I care for the opinion of the world (as the slang goes), I don’t choose to submit quietly to slander and malice.
  • That, once suspecting the existence of a conspiracy, they had no difficulty in tracing back its origin to the malice of Ralph, and the vindictiveness and avarice of Squeers.
  • The success of this first achievement prompted the malicious crowd, whose faces were clustered together in every variety of lank and half-starved ugliness, to further acts of outrage.
  • ’Tell me all about it again,’ cried Peg, with a malicious relish of her old master’s defeat, which made her natural hideousness something quite fearful; ’let’s hear it all again, beginning at the beginning now, as if you’d never told me.
  • It instantly roused all his dormant energies; rekindled in his breast the passions that, for many years, had found an improving home there; called up all his wrath, hatred, and malice; restored the sneer to his lip, and the scowl to his brow; and made him again, in all outward appearance, the same Ralph Nickleby whom so many had bitter cause to remember.
  • "Tilda HAS won something she didn’t expect, I think, haven’t you, dear?’ said Miss Squeers, maliciously.
  • …of those lightsome hours which make our childhood a time to be remembered like a happy dream through all our after life: a warm-hearted, harmless, affectionate creature, who never offended you, or did you wrong, but on whom you have vented the malice and hatred you have conceived for your nephew, and whom you have made an instrument for wreaking your bad passions upon him: what if we tell you that, sinking under your persecution, sir, and the misery and ill-usage of a life short in…

  • There are no more uses of "malicious" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • I am not interested in hearing malicious gossip.
  • Words can be like baseball bats when used maliciously.
    Sidney Madwed

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading