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disdain
in
Nicholas Nickleby
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disdain
Used In
Nicholas Nickleby
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  • Miss Squeers made no more direct reply than surveying her former friend from top to toe, and elevating her nose in the air with ineffable disdain.
  • The mutual inspection was at length brought to a close by Ralph withdrawing his eyes, with a great show of disdain, and calling Nicholas ’a boy.’
  • The swoln veins stood out like sinews on Ralph’s wrinkled forehead, and the nerves about his mouth worked as though some unendurable emotion wrung them; but he smiled disdainfully, and again pointed to the door.
  • ’With me, sir?’ retorted Sir Mulberry Hawk, eyeing him in disdainful surprise.
  • ’MUST know,’ interrupted the other disdainfully.
  • This his disdainful and insolent tone in their recent conversation (the only one they had held upon the subject since the period to which Sir Mulberry referred), effected.
  • ’Nonsense, sir!’ replied the young lady sharply, smiling though as she turned aside, and biting her lip, (whereat Mrs Browdie, who was still standing on the stairs, glanced at her with disdain, and called to her husband to come away).
  • With a disdainful scowl at the object of his anger, who met his eye but uttered not a word, Ralph walked away at his usual pace, without manifesting the slightest curiosity to see what became of his late companion, or indeed once looking behind him.

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  • She tries to be polite, but cannot hide her disdain for authority.
  • She has nothing but disdain for the notion that common people can regulate their own lives better than she can.

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