To better see all uses of the word
diminutive
in
Nicholas Nickleby
please enable javascript.

diminutive
Used In
Nicholas Nickleby
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • In one corner stood the diminutive pair of top-boots in which Miss Snevellicci was accustomed to enact the little jockey, and, folded on a chair hard by, was a small parcel, which bore a very suspicious resemblance to the companion smalls.
  • In a corner of the seat, was a very small deal trunk, tied round with a scanty piece of cord; and on the trunk was perched—his lace-up half-boots and corduroy trousers dangling in the air—a diminutive boy, with his shoulders drawn up to his ears, and his hands planted on his knees, who glanced timidly at the schoolmaster, from time to time, with evident dread and apprehension.
  • Pondering upon the advisability of this step, and the sensation it was likely to create in the neighbourhood, Mr Kenwigs betook himself to the sitting-room, where various extremely diminutive articles of clothing were airing on a horse before the fire, and Mr Lumbey, the doctor, was dandling the baby—that is, the old baby—not the new one.
  • The bile and rancour of the worthy Miss Knag undergoing no diminution during the remainder of the week, but rather augmenting with every successive hour; and the honest ire of all the young ladies rising, or seeming to rise, in exact proportion to the good spinster’s indignation, and both waxing very hot every time Miss Nickleby was called upstairs; it will be readily imagined that that young lady’s daily life was none of the most cheerful or enviable kind.

  • There are no more uses of "diminutive" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • She is a diminutive fighter pilot.
  • diminutive in stature

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading