To better see all uses of the word
Nicholas Nickleby
please enable javascript.

Used In
Nicholas Nickleby
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • We can go to the Workhouse, or the Refuge for the Destitute, or the Magdalen Hospital, I dare say; and the sooner we go the better.’
  • He had visited the houses of the poor in the various districts of London, and had found them destitute of the slightest vestige of a muffin, which there appeared too much reason to believe some of these indigent persons did not taste from year’s end to year’s end.
  • He had arranged a few regular lessons for the boys; and one night, as he paced up and down the dismal schoolroom, his swollen heart almost bursting to think that his protection and countenance should have increased the misery of the wretched being whose peculiar destitution had awakened his pity, he paused mechanically in a dark corner where sat the object of his thoughts.
  • Nicholas shrugged his shoulders; but sheer destitution was before him; and if he could summon fortitude to undergo the extremes of want and hardship, for what had he rescued his helpless charge if it were only to bear as hard a fate as that from which he had wrested him?
  • ’I am sixty years old, too,’ replied Ralph, ’and am neither destitute nor helpless.
  • The kind-hearted gentleman omitted to add that Newman Noggs, being utterly destitute, served him for rather less than the usual wages of a boy of thirteen; and likewise failed to mention in his hasty chronicle, that his eccentric taciturnity rendered him an especially valuable person in a place where much business was done, of which it was desirable no mention should be made out of doors.
  • He seemed to wait for some reply, but Ralph giving him none, he continued: ’I am a most miserable and wretched outcast, nearly sixty years old, and as destitute and helpless as a child of six.’

  • There are no more uses of "destitute" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • The article is entitled Destitute and Desperate in the Land of Plenty.
  • The worst solitude is to be destitute of sincere friendship.
    Sir Francis Bacon

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading