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delicacy
used in
Mansfield Park
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delicacy
Used in
Mansfield Park
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  • It requires a delicacy of feeling which they have not.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The play will be given up, and your delicacy honoured as it ought.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Delicacy to her parents made her careful not to betray such a preference of her uncle's house.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • If others have blundered, it is your place to put them right, and shew them what true delicacy is.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Here was again a want of delicacy and regard for others which had formerly so struck and disgusted her.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He, who had married a daughter to Mr. Rushworth: romantic delicacy was certainly not to be expected from him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She was nice only from natural delicacy, but he had been brought up in a school of luxury and epicurism.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It is a point of great delicacy, and you must assist us in our endeavours to choose exactly the right line of conduct.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But dear Maria has such a strict sense of propriety, so much of that true delicacy which one seldom meets with nowadays, Mrs. Rushworth—that wish of avoiding particularity!  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Upon my representation of what you were suffering, he immediately, and with the greatest delicacy, ceased to urge to see you for the present.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Her influence, or at least the consciousness and use of it, originated in an act of kindness by Susan, which, after many hesitations of delicacy, she at last worked herself up to.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She is exactly the woman to do away every prejudice of such a man as the Admiral, for she he would describe, if indeed he has now delicacy of language enough to embody his own ideas.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She had none of Fanny's delicacy of taste, of mind, of feeling; she saw Nature, inanimate Nature, with little observation; her attention was all for men and women, her talents for the light and lively.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She would not voluntarily give unnecessary pain to any one, and though I may deceive myself, I cannot but think that for me, for my feelings, she would—Hers are faults of principle, Fanny; of blunted delicacy and a corrupted, vitiated mind.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He was in love, very much in love; and it was a love which, operating on an active, sanguine spirit, of more warmth than delicacy, made her affection appear of greater consequence because it was withheld, and determined him to have the glory, as well as the felicity, of forcing her to love him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • With all the security which love of another and disesteem of him could give to the peace of mind he was attacking, his continued attentions—continued, but not obtrusive, and adapting themselves more and more to the gentleness and delicacy of her character—obliged her very soon to dislike him less than formerly.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She certainly understands you better than you are understood by the greater part of those who have known you so long; and with regard to some others, I can perceive, from occasional lively hints, the unguarded expressions of the moment, that she could define many as accurately, did not delicacy forbid it.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Susan shewed that she had delicacy: pleased as she was to be mistress of property which she had been struggling for at least two years, she yet feared that her sister's judgment had been against her, and that a reproof was designed her for having so struggled as to make the purchase necessary for the tranquillity of the house.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Julia did seem inclined to admit that Maria's situation might require particular caution and delicacy—but that could not extend to her_—she was at liberty; and Maria evidently considered her engagement as only raising her so much more above restraint, and leaving her less occasion than Julia to consult either father or mother.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • To be a second time disappointed in the same way was an instance of very severe ill-luck; and his indignation was such, that had it not been for delicacy towards his friend, and his friend's youngest sister, he believed he should certainly attack the baronet on the absurdity of his proceedings, and argue him into a little more rationality.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I would not have the shadow of a coolness between the two whose intimacy I have been observing with the greatest pleasure, and in whose characters there is so much general resemblance in true generosity and natural delicacy as to make the few slight differences, resulting principally from situation, no reasonable hindrance to a perfect friendship.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • He had every well-grounded reason for solid attachment; he knew her to have all the worth that could justify the warmest hopes of lasting happiness with her; her conduct at this very time, by speaking the disinterestedness and delicacy of her character (qualities which he believed most rare indeed), was of a sort to heighten all his wishes, and confirm all his resolutions.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • My dear Sir Thomas, I perfectly comprehend you, and do justice to the generosity and delicacy of your notions, which indeed are quite of a piece with your general conduct; and I entirely agree with you in the main as to the propriety of doing everything one could by way of providing for a child one had in a manner taken into one's own hands; and I am sure I should be the last person in the world to withhold my mite upon such an occasion.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • She considered it all as nonsense, as mere trifling and gallantry, which meant only to deceive for the hour; she could not but feel that it was treating her improperly and unworthily, and in such a way as she had not deserved; but it was like himself, and entirely of a piece with what she had seen before; and she would not allow herself to shew half the displeasure she felt, because he had been conferring an obligation, which no want of delicacy on his part could make a trifle to her.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • And then he would have changed the subject, and sipped his coffee in peace over domestic matters of a calmer hue; but Mr. Yates, without discernment to catch Sir Thomas's meaning, or diffidence, or delicacy, or discretion enough to allow him to lead the discourse while he mingled among the others with the least obtrusiveness himself, would keep him on the topic of the theatre, would torment him with questions and remarks relative to it, and finally would make him hear the whole history…  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: discuss with delicacy
as in: eat the delicacy
as in: offend her delicacy
as in: delicacy of her brushwork
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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