To better see all uses of the word
lament
in
Mansfield Park
please enable javascript.

lament
Used In
Mansfield Park
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • I mean to be too rich to lament or to feel anything of the sort.
  • It was bad, very bad in me against such a creature; but I did not know her then; and she shall have no reason to lament the hour that first put it into my head.
  • Yes, she laments it; yet owns it may have been best.
  • To talk over the dreadful business with Fanny, talk and lament, was all Lady Bertram’s consolation.
  • She had found a seat, where in excessive trembling she was enduring all these fearful thoughts, while the other three, no longer under any restraint, were giving vent to their feelings of vexation, lamenting over such an unlooked-for premature arrival as a most untoward event, and without mercy wishing poor Sir Thomas had been twice as long on his passage, or were still in Antigua.
  • This wish was levelled principally at Julia, who had just applied for permission to go to town with Maria; and as Sir Thomas thought it best for each daughter that the permission should be granted, Lady Bertram, though in her own good-nature she would not have prevented it, was lamenting the change it made in the prospect of Julia’s return, which would otherwise have taken place about this time.
  • William knew what had passed, and from his heart lamented that his sister’s feelings should be so cold towards a man whom he must consider as the first of human characters; but he was of an age to be all for love, and therefore unable to blame; and knowing her wish on the subject, he would not distress her by the slightest allusion.
  • Her father read his newspaper, and her mother lamented over the ragged carpet as usual, while the tea was in preparation, and wished Rebecca would mend it; and Fanny was first roused by his calling out to her, after humphing and considering over a particular paragraph: "What’s the name of your great cousins in town, Fan?"
  • Her days were spent in a kind of slow bustle; all was busy without getting on, always behindhand and lamenting it, without altering her ways; wishing to be an economist, without contrivance or regularity; dissatisfied with her servants, without skill to make them better, and whether helping, or reprimanding, or indulging them, without any power of engaging their respect.
  • …like tranquillity might now be hoped for; and accordingly, when Rebecca had been prevailed on to carry away the tea-things, and Mrs. Price had walked about the room some time looking for a shirt-sleeve, which Betsey at last hunted out from a drawer in the kitchen, the small party of females were pretty well composed, and the mother having lamented again over the impossibility of getting Sam ready in time, was at leisure to think of her eldest daughter and the friends she had come from.

  • There are no more uses of "lament" in the book.


    Show samples from other sources
  • She lamented the loss.
  • We lamented our sad circumstances.

  • Go to more samples
Show Multiple Meanings (Less common than this sense)
Go to Book Vocabulary
verbalworkout.com . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading