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Heart of Darkness
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pilgrim -- (with a lowercase "p")
Used In
Heart of Darkness
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  • They wandered here and there with their absurd long staves in their hands, like a lot of faithless pilgrims bewitched inside a rotten fence.
  • The pilgrims could be seen in knots gesticulating, discussing.
  • I became in an instant as much of a pretense as the rest of the bewitched pilgrims.
  • I put the helm hard a-starboard at the moment when the pilgrim in pink pyjamas, very hot and agitated, appeared in the doorway.
  • The red-haired pilgrim was beside himself with the thought that at least this poor Kurtz had been properly revenged.
  • However, they were all waiting—all the sixteen or twenty pilgrims of them—for something; and upon my word it did not seem an uncongenial occupation, from the way they took it, though the only thing that ever came to them was disease—as far as I could see.
  • The pilgrims used to turn out in a body and empty every rifle they could lay hands on at him.
  • It must have made some of the pilgrims sit up in their hovels.
  • I had the manager on board and three or four pilgrims with their staves—all complete.
  • Where the pilgrims imagined it crawled to I don’t know.
  • Two pilgrims were quarreling in hurried whispers as to which bank.
  • You should have seen the pilgrims stare!
  • The pilgrims had opened with their Winchesters, and were simply squirting lead into that bush.
  • You see I rather chummed with the few mechanics there were in that station, whom the other pilgrims naturally despised—on account of their imperfect manners, I suppose.
  • The simple old sailor, with his talk of chains and purchases, made me forget the jungle and the pilgrims in a delicious sensation of having come upon something unmistakably real.
  • What is the meaning—?’ stammered at my elbow one of the pilgrims,—a little fat man, with sandy hair and red whiskers, who wore side-spring boots, and pink pyjamas tucked into his socks.
  • I had been dimly aware for some time of a worrying noise, and when I lifted my eyes I saw the wood-pile was gone, and the manager, aided by all the pilgrims, was shouting at me from the river-side.
  • It came in sections during the next three weeks, each section headed by a donkey carrying a white man in new clothes and tan shoes, bowing from that elevation right and left to the impressed pilgrims.
  • All the pilgrims and the manager were then congregated on the awning-deck about the pilot-house, chattering at each other like a flock of excited magpies, and there was a scandalized murmur at my heartless promptitude.
  • Certainly they had brought with them some rotten hippo-meat, which couldn’t have lasted very long, anyway, even if the pilgrims hadn’t, in the midst of a shocking hullabaloo, thrown a considerable quantity of it overboard.
  • When the manager, escorted by the pilgrims, all of them armed to the teeth, had gone to the house, this chap came on board.
  • The Russian, eyed curiously by the pilgrims, was staring at the shore.
  • The pilgrims murmured at my back.
  • I saw a row of pilgrims squirting lead in the air out of Winchesters held to the hip.
  • The pilgrims looked upon me with disfavor.
  • All the pilgrims rushed out to see.
  • But I am of course aware that next day the pilgrims buried something in a muddy hole.
  • I pulled the string of the whistle, and I did this because I saw the pilgrims on deck getting out their rifles with an air of anticipating a jolly lark.
  • Some of the pilgrims behind the stretcher carried his arms—two shot-guns, a heavy rifle, and a light revolver-carbine—the thunderbolts of that pitiful Jupiter.
  • The pilgrims were dining in the mess-room, and I took my place opposite the manager, who lifted his eyes to give me a questioning glance, which I successfully ignored.
  • He had the power to charm or frighten rudimentary souls into an aggravated witch-dance in his honor; he could also fill the small souls of the pilgrims with bitter misgivings: he had one devoted friend at least, and he had conquered one soul in the world that was neither rudimentary nor tainted with self-seeking.
  • I looked at them with a swift quickening of interest—not because it occurred to me I might be eaten by them before very long, though I own to you that just then I perceived—in a new light, as it were—how unwholesome the pilgrims looked, and I hoped, yes, I positively hoped, that my aspect was not so—what shall I say?
  • I had to keep guessing at the channel; I had to discern, mostly by inspiration, the signs of hidden banks; I watched for sunken stones; I was learning to clap my teeth smartly before my heart flew out, when I shaved by a fluke some infernal sly old snag that would have ripped the life out of the tin-pot steamboat and drowned all the pilgrims; I had to keep a look-out for the signs of dead wood we could cut up in the night for next day’s steaming.

  • There are no more uses of "pilgrim" in the book.

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  • Three pilgrims were killed in the bus crash.
  • every pilgrim and stranger was welcome,
    Hermann Hesse  --  Siddhartha

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