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wretched
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Hard Times
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wretched
Used In
Hard Times
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  • The wretched ignorance with which Jupe clung to this consolation, rejecting the superior comfort of knowing, on a sound arithmetical basis, that her father was an unnatural vagabond, filled Mr. Gradgrind with pity.
  • How it came to pass that any people found it worth their while to sell or buy the wretched little toys, mixed up in its window with cheap newspapers and pork (there was a leg to be raffled for to-morrow-night), matters not here.
  • The wretched whelp plucked up a ghastly courage, and began to grow defiant.
  • ’Your wretched brother,’ said Mr. Gradgrind.
  • ’What motive — even what motive in reason — can you have for preventing the escape of this wretched youth,’ said Mr. Gradgrind, ’and crushing his miserable father?
  • Then the wretched boy looked cautiously up and found her gone, crept out of bed, fastened his door, and threw himself upon his pillow again: tearing his hair, morosely crying, grudgingly loving her, hatefully but impenitently spurning himself, and no less hatefully and unprofitably spurning all the good in the world.
  • Mr. Bounderby silently gazed about him for some moments, in every direction except Mrs. Sparsit’s direction; and then, abruptly turning upon the niece of Lady Scadgers, said to that wretched woman: ’Now, ma’am!
  • ’But,’ said Mr. Gradgrind, slowly, and with hesitation, as well as with a wretched sense of happiness, ’if I see reason to mistrust myself for the past, Louisa, I should also mistrust myself for the present and the future.

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  • The children were taken into protective custody due to their wretched living conditions.
  • The photograph showed poor people in a wretched village in East Africa.

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