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Hard Times
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retort -- as in: quick retort
Used In
Hard Times
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  • He was very quick upon her with this retort.
  • The same Signor Jupe was to ’enliven the varied performances at frequent intervals with his chaste Shaksperean quips and retorts.’
  • ’Lower yourself, then,’ retorted Cupid.
  • ’We’d have had a young gentleman to meet you, if we had known you were coming,’ retorted Master Kidderminster, nothing abashed.
  • ’It’s all the same to me what he is or what he is not, whether in English or whether in French,’ retorted Mr. E. W. B. Childers, facing about.
  • ’It is quite right, my dear,’ retorted her father approvingly, ’to be exact.
  • ’I have not,’ retorted Mr. Childers, after surveying him from head to foot, ’the honour of knowing you, — but if you mean that you can make more money of your time than I can of mine, I should judge from your appearance, that you are about right.’
  • ’You are a piece of caustic, Tom,’ retorted Mr. James Harthouse.
  • ’Come!’ retorted Bounderby, stopping to wheel round upon him, ’let’s have none of your interruptions.
  • The white night-cap, embellished with two peacock’s feathers and a pigtail bolt upright, in which Signor Jupe had that very afternoon enlivened the varied performances with his chaste Shaksperean quips and retorts, hung upon a nail; but no other portion of his wardrobe, or other token of himself or his pursuits, was to be seen anywhere.
  • ’Just wait a bit,’ retorted Bounderby; ’you have said your say, I believe.
  • ’Well, ma’am?’ retorted Mr. Bounderby.
  • Cursing these quick retorts of the young gentleman to whom he was so true a friend, Mr. Harthouse disembarrassed himself of that interview with the smallest conceivable amount of ceremony, and debated for the hundredth time what all this could mean?
  • You are not aware perhaps,’ retorted Mr. Bounderby, ’that you yourself have been looked after now and then, not being considered quite free from suspicion in this business, on account of most people being judged according to the company they keep.
  • Bounderby,’ retorted Mrs. Sparsit, ’your will is to me a law, sir; otherwise, it might be my inclination to dispute your kind commands, not feeling sure that it will be quite so agreeable to Miss Gradgrind to receive me, as it ever is to your own munificent hospitality.

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  • She wanted to retort that he that he sounded more foolish than he looked, but she made herself count to ten and thought better of it.
  • She retorted, "Takes one to know one."

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