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Far from the Madding Crowd
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Far from the Madding Crowd
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  • I took for earnest what you insist was jest, and now this that I pray to be jest you say is awful, wretched earnest.
  • Wretched woman—deluded woman—you are, Bathsheba!
  • "Yes, if it hadn’t been for that wretched rain I should have cleared two hundred as easy as looking, my love," he was saying.
  • Here’s—wretched—the merest trifle.
  • Three booths were blown over, and the wretched folk inside crawled out upon their hands and knees; and in the next field were as many as a dozen hats at one time.
  • Here, under the table, and leaning against forms and chairs in every conceivable attitude except the perpendicular, were the wretched persons of all the work-folk, the hair of their heads at such low levels being suggestive of mops and brooms.
  • This was the entrance to the gaol, and over it a lamp was fixed, the light enabling the wretched traveller to find a bell-pull.
  • "I don’t know what’s the matter, I feel wretched at one time, and buoyant at another.
  • Liddy kept watch in Bathsheba’s chamber, where she heard her mistress, moaning in whispers through the dull slow hours of that wretched night: "Oh it is my fault—how can I live!

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  • The children were taken into protective custody due to their wretched living conditions.
  • The photograph showed poor people in a wretched village in East Africa.

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