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perception
used in
Far from the Madding Crowd
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perception
Used in
Far from the Madding Crowd
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  • Hence Bathsheba lived in a perception that her purposes were broken off.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • During the first stages of his return to perception peculiar deeds seemed to be in course of enactment.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • A perception caused him to withdraw his own eyes from hers as suddenly as if he had been caught in a theft.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • "Yes; and he said there was a strong likeness between himself and the other young man, so that sometimes people mistook them—" "Liddy, for Heaven's sake stop your talking!" said Bathsheba, with the nervous petulance that comes from worrying perceptions.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Honesty and pure conviction suggested the remark, unaccompanied by any perception that it might have been adopted by blunt flattery to soothe and win her.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Farmer Boldwood had read the pantomime denoting that they were aware of his presence, and the perception was as too much light turned upon his new sensibility.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Troy, in his prostration at this time, had no perception that in the futility of these romantic doings, dictated by a remorseful reaction from previous indifference, there was any element of absurdity.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • In the turmoil of her anxiety for her lover she had agreed to marry him; but the perception that had accompanied her happiest hours on this account was rather that of self-sacrifice than of promotion and honour.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • "Ay," said Joseph, acquiring confidence from the warmth of the fire, the cider, and a perception of the narrative capabilities of the experience alluded to.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It is rarely that the pleasures of the imagination will compensate for the pain of sleeplessness, but they possibly did with Oak to-night, for the delight of merely seeing her effaced for the time his perception of the great difference between seeing and possessing.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Nevertheless, this thought of how the apparent might differ from the real—made vivid by her bygone jealousy of Fanny, and the remorse he had shown that night—did not blind her to the perception of a likelier difference, less tragic, but to herself far more disastrous.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The wondrous power of flattery in passados at woman is a perception so universal as to be remarked upon by many people almost as automatically as they repeat a proverb, or say that they are Christians and the like, without thinking much of the enormous corollaries which spring from the proposition.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Oak may have had the best of intentions in withholding for as many days as possible the details of what had happened to Fanny; but had he known that Bathsheba's perceptions had already been exercised in the matter, he would have done nothing to lengthen the minutes of suspense she was now undergoing, when the certainty which must terminate it would be the worst fact suspected after all.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: perception of external stimuli
as in: perception of injustice
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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