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Far from the Madding Crowd
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Far from the Madding Crowd
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  • Gabriel ceased his rustling.
  • He had just reached the time of life at which "young" is ceasing to be the prefix of "man" in speaking of one.
  • The wind continued to beat about the corners of the hut, but the flute-playing ceased.
  • The cow had ceased to give milk for that year, and Bathsheba Everdene came up the hill no more.
  • Almost before he had ceased speaking, Oak was seized with a misgiving as to whose ear was the recipient of his answer.
  • Oak suddenly ceased from being a mere spectator by discovering the case to be more serious than he had at first imagined.
  • The flames immediately ceased to go under the bottom of the corn-stack, and stood up vertical.
  • Whenever Boldwood dozed she took a form, and comparatively ceased to be a vision: when he awoke there was the letter justifying the dream.
  • Apparently he had some time ago reached that entrance to middle age at which a man’s aspect naturally ceases to alter for the term of a dozen years or so; and, artificially, a woman’s does likewise.
  • The performer seemed quite at home anywhere between a horse’s head and its tail, and the necessity for this abnormal attitude having ceased with the passage of the plantation, she began to adopt another, even more obviously convenient than the first.
  • "Whatever IS the matter, men?" she said, meeting them at the door just as she was coming out on her way to church, and ceasing in a moment from the close compression of her two red lips, with which she had accompanied the exertion of pulling on a tight glove.
  • When the love-led man had ceased from his labours, Bathsheba came and looked him in the face.
  • Joseph perceived it, and with hectic cheeks of indignation instantly ceased singing.
  • Standing in the centre, the sky overhead was met by a circular horizon of fern: this grew nearly to the bottom of the slope and then abruptly ceased.
  • The hissing of the sword had ceased, and he stopped entirely.
  • It had required a little determination—far more than she had at first imagined—to take up a position here, for at her first entry the lumbering dialogues had ceased, nearly every face had been turned towards her, and those that were already turned rigidly fixed there.
  • To the shepherd, the note of the sheep-bell, like the ticking of the clock to other people, is a chronic sound that only makes itself noticed by ceasing or altering in some unusual manner from the well-known idle twinkle which signifies to the accustomed ear, however distant, that all is well in the fold.
  • The conversation (which seemed to have been concerning the origin of the fire) immediately ceased, and every one ocularly criticised him to the degree expressed by contracting the flesh of their foreheads and looking at him with narrowed eyelids, as if he had been a light too strong for their sight.
  • CHAPTER XXI TROUBLES IN THE FOLD—A MESSAGE Gabriel Oak had ceased to feed the Weatherbury flock for about four-and-twenty hours, when on Sunday afternoon the elderly gentlemen Joseph Poorgrass, Matthew Moon, Fray, and half-a-dozen others, came running up to the house of the mistress of the Upper Farm.
  • But limitation of the capacity is never recognized as a loss by the loser therefrom: in this attribute moral or aesthetic poverty contrasts plausibly with material, since those who suffer do not mind it, whilst those who mind it soon cease to suffer.
  • Bathsheba had reached a stage at which people cease to have any appreciative regard for public opinion.
  • They drew nearer, and ceased at the gate.
  • The temporary coma had ceased, and activity had come with the necessity for it.
  • I, for one, shall never cease regretting that events so fell out as to deny you to me.
  • Her original vigorous pride of youth had sickened, and with it had declined all her anxieties about coming years, since anxiety recognizes a better and a worse alternative, and Bathsheba had made up her mind that alternatives on any noteworthy scale had ceased for her.
  • The rain had quite ceased, and the sun was shining through the green, brown, and yellow leaves, now sparkling and varnished by the raindrops to the brightness of similar effects in the landscapes of Ruysdael and Hobbema, and full of all those infinite beauties that arise from the union of water and colour with high lights.
  • …it firmly, allowing herself, nevertheless, as girls will, to dwell upon the happy life she would have enjoyed had Troy been Boldwood, and the path of love the path of duty—inflicting upon herself gratuitous tortures by imagining him the lover of another woman after forgetting her; for she had penetrated Troy’s nature so far as to estimate his tendencies pretty accurately, but unfortunately loved him no less in thinking that he might soon cease to love her—indeed, considerably more.
  • ] "He is," said Henery, implying that irony must cease at a certain point.
  • Perhaps it would be more accurately described as a determined rebellion against her prejudices, a revulsion from a lower instinct of uncharitableness, which would have withheld all sympathy from the dead woman, because in life she had preceded Bathsheba in the attentions of a man whom Bathsheba had by no means ceased from loving, though her love was sick to death just now with the gravity of a further misgiving.
  • "Yes—I’ve long ceased to doubt that.

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  • They signed a cease-fire agreement.
  • They agreed to a temporary cease-fire so non-combatants could leave the area.

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