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Far from the Madding Crowd
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Far from the Madding Crowd
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  • —I mane a bad servant and a good master.
  • "Yes, sir—ma’am I mane," said the person addressed.
  • "Please nine and ninepence and a good halfpenny where ’twas a bad one, sir—ma’am I mane."
  • The hill was covered on its northern side by an ancient and decaying plantation of beeches, whose upper verge formed a line over the crest, fringing its arched curve against the sky, like a mane.
  • Well, a very good-hearted man were Farmer Everdene, and I being a respectable young fellow was allowed to call and see her and drink as much ale as I liked, but not to carry away any—outside my skin I mane of course.
  • "I don’t mind saying ’tis true, but I don’t like to say ’tis damn true, if that’s what you mane."
  • All I mane is that in common truth ’twas Miss Everdene and Sergeant Troy, but in the horrible so-help-me truth that ye want to make of it perhaps ’twas somebody else!
  • Springing down into Boldwood’s pastures, each pocketed his halter to hide it from the horses, who, seeing the men empty-handed, docilely allowed themselves to be seized by the mane, when the halters were dexterously slipped on.
  • You like the woman who owns that pretty hair—yes; it is pretty—more beautiful than my miserable black mane!

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  • It was a healthy male lion with a golden mane.
  • She brushed the horse’s mane and tail.

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