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Far from the Madding Crowd
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Far from the Madding Crowd
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  • Liddy, elevating her feelings to the occasion from a sense of grandeur, floated off behind Bathsheba with a milder dignity not entirely free from travesty, and the door was closed.
  • It is both the grandeur and the pain of the remoter moods that they avoid the pathway of sound.
  • The vast porches at the sides, lofty enough to admit a waggon laden to its highest with corn in the sheaf, were spanned by heavy-pointed arches of stone, broadly and boldly cut, whose very simplicity was the origin of a grandeur not apparent in erections where more ornament has been attempted.
  • The fact that four centuries had neither proved it to be founded on a mistake, inspired any hatred of its purpose, nor given rise to any reaction that had battered it down, invested this simple grey effort of old minds with a repose, if not a grandeur, which a too curious reflection was apt to disturb in its ecclesiastical and military compeers.

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  • The hotel is well past the days of its grandeur.
  • What have wealth or grandeur to do with happiness?
    Jane Austen  --  Sense and Sensibility

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