To see all instances of the word
endure
used in
Far from the Madding Crowd
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endure
Used in
Far from the Madding Crowd
Go to Book Vocabulary
  • Don't think I am a timid woman and can't endure things.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • What a way Oak had, she thought, of enduring things.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Six years were a long time, but how much shorter than never, the idea he had for so long been obliged to endure!  (not reviewed by editor)

  • You torture me to say it was done in thoughtlessness—I never thought of it in that light, and I can't endure it.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The sight, coming as it did, superimposed upon the other dark scenery of the previous days, formed a sort of climax to the whole panorama, and it was more than he could endure.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • I can endure being told I am in the wrong, if you will only tell it me gently! O sir, will you not kindly forgive me, and look at it cheerfully?  (not reviewed by editor)

  • That Bathsheba could not endure this man was evident; in fact, he was continually coming to her with some tale or other, by which he might creep into favour at the expense of persons maligned.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Bathsheba was not a women to be made a fool of, or a woman to suffer in silence; and how could he endure existence with a spirited wife to whom at first entering he would be beholden for food and lodging?  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: endure through the ages
as in: endured the pain
To see an overview of word senses, click here.

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