To better see all uses of the word
Far from the Madding Crowd
please enable javascript.

Used In
Far from the Madding Crowd
Go to Book Vocabulary
Go to Word Detail
  • In about the time a person unaccustomed to bodily labour would have decided upon which side to lie, Farmer Oak was asleep.
  • Springing to her accustomed perpendicular like a bowed sapling, and satisfying herself that nobody was in sight, she seated herself in the manner demanded by the saddle, though hardly expected of the woman, and trotted off in the direction of Tewnell Mill.
  • To the shepherd, the note of the sheep-bell, like the ticking of the clock to other people, is a chronic sound that only makes itself noticed by ceasing or altering in some unusual manner from the well-known idle twinkle which signifies to the accustomed ear, however distant, that all is well in the fold.
  • Having from their youth up been entirely unaccustomed to any liquor stronger than cider or mild ale, it was no wonder that they had succumbed, one and all, with extraordinary uniformity, after the lapse of about an hour.
  • Beside her Oak now noticed a little calf about a day old, looking idiotically at the two women, which showed that it had not long been accustomed to the phenomenon of eyesight, and often turning to the lantern, which it apparently mistook for the moon, inherited instinct having as yet had little time for correction by experience.
  • I shan’t mind it again, for they will all have grown accustomed to seeing me there; but this morning it was as bad as being married—eyes everywhere!"

  • There are no more uses of "accustomed" in the book.

    Show samples from other sources
  • In the United States we’re accustomed to forming our own opinion about the promises of advertisements and politicians.
  • Actors and politicians are accustomed to less privacy than the rest of us.

  • Go to more samples
Go to Book Vocabulary . . . enhancing vocabulary while reading