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wither
in
Far from the Madding Crowd
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wither
Used In
Far from the Madding Crowd
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  • But the next day He prepared a worm to smite the gourd and wither it; and I feel it is better to die than to live!
  • They moved on without further speech, some early-withered leaves from the trees which hooded the road at this spot occasionally spinning downward across their path to the earth.
  • All the ancient men ran in a jumbled throng after her to the clover-field, Joseph sinking down in the midst when about half-way, like an individual withering in a world which was more and more insupportable.
  • They came in yet greater volumes, and indolently crept across the intervening valleys, and around the withered papery flags of the moor and river brinks.
  • On looking into the place, it occurred to her that she had seen it by daylight on some previous occasion, and that what appeared like an impassable thicket was in reality a brake of fern now withering fast.
  • Boldwood was listlessly noting how the frost had hardened and glazed the surface of the snow, till it shone in the red eastern light with the polish of marble; how, in some portions of the slope, withered grass-bents, encased in icicles, bristled through the smooth wan coverlet in the twisted and curved shapes of old Venetian glass; and how the footprints of a few birds, which had hopped over the snow whilst it lay in the state of a soft fleece, were now frozen to a short permanency.

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  • The grapes withered on the vine.
  • Her confidence withered under the criticism.

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