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anxiety
in
Far from the Madding Crowd
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anxiety
Used In
Far from the Madding Crowd
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  • Troy had laughed, but it was with some anxiety that he said...
  • The expression of her face, which had been one of intense anxiety, sank at the sight of his nearly to terror.
  • "We hear that ye be a extraordinary good and clever man, shepherd," said Joseph Poorgrass with considerable anxiety from behind the maltster’s bedstead, whither he had retired for safety.
  • A distressing explanation of this anxiety to be rid of him at that point now ensued.
  • "I hope I am not a bold sort of maid—mannish?" she continued with some anxiety.
  • The anxiety upon Troy’s face was unusual and very marked.
  • By this time stupor had given place to anxiety, and anxiety began to make room for hunger and thirst.
  • By this time stupor had given place to anxiety, and anxiety began to make room for hunger and thirst.
  • When the weeks intervening between the night of this conversation and Christmas day began perceptibly to diminish, her anxiety and perplexity increased.
  • Gabriel’s anxiety was great that Boldwood might be saved, even though in his conscience he felt that he ought to die; for there had been qualities in the farmer which Oak loved.
  • As Boldwood continued awhile in his room alone—ready and dressed to receive his company—the mood of anxiety about his appearance seemed to pass away, and to be succeeded by a deep solemnity.
  • In the turmoil of her anxiety for her lover she had agreed to marry him; but the perception that had accompanied her happiest hours on this account was rather that of self-sacrifice than of promotion and honour.
  • Her original vigorous pride of youth had sickened, and with it had declined all her anxieties about coming years, since anxiety recognizes a better and a worse alternative, and Bathsheba had made up her mind that alternatives on any noteworthy scale had ceased for her.
  • Her original vigorous pride of youth had sickened, and with it had declined all her anxieties about coming years, since anxiety recognizes a better and a worse alternative, and Bathsheba had made up her mind that alternatives on any noteworthy scale had ceased for her.
  • A reserved and sombre expression had returned to Boldwood’s face again, but it poorly cloaked his feelings when he pronounced Bathsheba’s name; and his feverish anxiety continued to show its existence by a galloping motion of his fingers upon the side of his thigh as he went down the stairs.
  • "Bathsheba is a woman well to do," continued Boldwood, in nervous anxiety, and, Troy, she will make a good wife; and, indeed, she is worth your hastening on your marriage with her!"
  • Good afternoon, ma’am" he concluded, in evident anxiety to get away, and at once went out of the churchyard by a path she could follow on no pretence whatever.

  • There are no more uses of "anxiety" in the book.


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  • She suffers from more than the usual pre-test anxiety.
  • It is a vicious cycle in which worry leads to a drop in the stock market and the drop in the stock market leads to increased anxiety.

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