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  • On this article I can fully acquit him.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • But this does not acquit him, Mrs. Weston; and I must say, that I think him greatly to blame.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • The event acquitted her of all the fancifulness, and all the selfishness of imaginary complaints.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • It was an awkward ceremony at any time to be receiving wedding visits, and a man had need be all grace to acquit himself well through it.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Emma was very willing now to acquit her of having seduced Mr. Dixon's actions from his wife, or of any thing mischievous which her imagination had suggested at first.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Acquit me here, and procure for me, when it is allowable, the acquittal and good wishes of that said Emma Woodhouse, whom I regard with so much brotherly affection, as to long to have her as deeply and as happily in love as myself.  (not reviewed by editor)

  • Why she did not like Jane Fairfax might be a difficult question to answer; Mr. Knightley had once told her it was because she saw in her the really accomplished young woman, which she wanted to be thought herself; and though the accusation had been eagerly refuted at the time, there were moments of self-examination in which her conscience could not quite acquit her.  (not reviewed by editor)

To see samples from other sources, click a sense of the word below:
as in: she acquitted herself well
as in: she was acquitted
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